2 Include screenshot from OS X
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We could use STIX. This is the font MathJax will use by default, so it should give the most consistent integration of formulas and written texts. And the font should contain many special Unicode symbols useful for mathematics, and many mathematicians will have these fonts installed. For those who don't have it installed, a downloadable version can be provided, to be automatically used by browsers without any user intervention, but perhaps with a little delay on the first visit to the site.

Changing the font of the above post to STIXGeneral, it looks like this (on Linuxon OS X Firefox with a computed font size of 13px for the text

OS X snapshot

and like this on Linux with a computed font size of 15px for the text):

STIXGeneralLinux snapshot

As you can see, the font looks a lot thinner than Georgia, and still a bit thinner than Times New Roman. More notably, it is a lot wider than Times New Roman. In fact, the horizontal spacing looks similar to Georgia, I think. One important drawback might beI am somewhat surprised by how different the hinting: it seemssame font renders on different OS. It might have something to me that Georgiado with how the hinting is a lot more elaboratehandled, giving cleaner shapes at screen resolutions than STIXor what the autohinter will do in the absence of hints.

As you might have noticed, the math number in the above snapshot still looks bigger. This is because MathJax styles one of its many <span>s with font-size: 108%. I guess there should be ways to disabuse it of this practice, to make the font sizes completely equal for formulas and other text.

We could use STIX. This is the font MathJax will use by default, so it should give the most consistent integration of formulas and written texts. And the font should contain many special Unicode symbols useful for mathematics, and many mathematicians will have these fonts installed. For those who don't have it installed, a downloadable version can be provided, to be automatically used by browsers without any user intervention, but perhaps with a little delay on the first visit to the site.

Changing the font of the above post to STIXGeneral, it looks like this (on Linux and with a computed font size of 15px for the text):

STIXGeneral

As you can see, the font looks a lot thinner than Georgia, and still a bit thinner than Times New Roman. More notably, it is a lot wider than Times New Roman. In fact, the horizontal spacing looks similar to Georgia, I think. One important drawback might be the hinting: it seems to me that Georgia hinting is a lot more elaborate, giving cleaner shapes at screen resolutions than STIX.

As you might have noticed, the math number in the above snapshot still looks bigger. This is because MathJax styles one of its many <span>s with font-size: 108%. I guess there should be ways to disabuse it of this practice, to make the font sizes completely equal for formulas and other text.

We could use STIX. This is the font MathJax will use by default, so it should give the most consistent integration of formulas and written texts. And the font should contain many special Unicode symbols useful for mathematics, and many mathematicians will have these fonts installed. For those who don't have it installed, a downloadable version can be provided, to be automatically used by browsers without any user intervention, but perhaps with a little delay on the first visit to the site.

Changing the font of the above post to STIXGeneral, it looks like this on OS X Firefox with a computed font size of 13px for the text

OS X snapshot

and like this on Linux with a computed font size of 15px for the text:

Linux snapshot

As you can see, the font looks a lot thinner than Georgia, and still a bit thinner than Times New Roman. More notably, it is a lot wider than Times New Roman. In fact, the horizontal spacing looks similar to Georgia, I think. I am somewhat surprised by how different the same font renders on different OS. It might have something to do with how the hinting is handled, or what the autohinter will do in the absence of hints.

As you might have noticed, the math number in the above snapshot still looks bigger. This is because MathJax styles one of its many <span>s with font-size: 108%. I guess there should be ways to disabuse it of this practice, to make the font sizes completely equal for formulas and other text.

1
source | link

We could use STIX. This is the font MathJax will use by default, so it should give the most consistent integration of formulas and written texts. And the font should contain many special Unicode symbols useful for mathematics, and many mathematicians will have these fonts installed. For those who don't have it installed, a downloadable version can be provided, to be automatically used by browsers without any user intervention, but perhaps with a little delay on the first visit to the site.

Changing the font of the above post to STIXGeneral, it looks like this (on Linux and with a computed font size of 15px for the text):

STIXGeneral

As you can see, the font looks a lot thinner than Georgia, and still a bit thinner than Times New Roman. More notably, it is a lot wider than Times New Roman. In fact, the horizontal spacing looks similar to Georgia, I think. One important drawback might be the hinting: it seems to me that Georgia hinting is a lot more elaborate, giving cleaner shapes at screen resolutions than STIX.

As you might have noticed, the math number in the above snapshot still looks bigger. This is because MathJax styles one of its many <span>s with font-size: 108%. I guess there should be ways to disabuse it of this practice, to make the font sizes completely equal for formulas and other text.