4 replaced http://math.stackexchange.com/ with https://math.stackexchange.com/
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While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggesting an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?When should I edit posts?, this meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggesting an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?, this meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggesting an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?, this meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

3 replaced http://meta.math.stackexchange.com/ with https://math.meta.stackexchange.com/
source | link

While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggesting an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?, this meta questionthis meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggesting an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?, this meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggesting an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?, this meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

2 minor typo
source | link

While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggestsuggesting an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?, this meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggest an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?, this meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

While it is conceivable that people might review your suggested edit incorrectly once or twice, in general, if your suggested edit is rejected, it is rejected for a reason. Users under 2k rep do not have the editing privelege themselves; a suggested edit is only a suggestion, and you don't get to make the final decision. Repeatedly suggesting an edit until it is accepted is poor behavior for this site.

So why were your edits rejected? When should I edit posts?, this meta question and many other questions on meta should help you understand when to edit and when not to. In particular, please keep in mind the following points which seem relevant to the case at hand:

  • Editing older posts is discouraged unless the edits are really important, because editing a post bumps it. Even relatively new posts should usually only be edited if they can be improved significantly (otherwise they will be bumped unnecessarily).
  • Avoid editing a proof inside question to be correct, because this often changes the meaning of the post. This is especially the case if the user is asking, "is my proof correct?" Of course it would defeat the purpose to edit the proof to be correct.

Different users inevitably have different opinions and styles on how to edit and when to edit, so you can fluxuate a little from the norm if you're confident it will benefit the site - just keep within these general guidelines.

1
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