5 replaced http://math.stackexchange.com/ with https://math.stackexchange.com/
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Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account)“The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit.

Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit.

Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit.

4 Removed claim that Terence Tao first posted the puzzle in response to @quid's comment
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Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE, containing a logic puzzle that was first posted by Terence Tao.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit.

Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE, containing a logic puzzle that was first posted by Terence Tao.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit.

Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit.

3 deleted 276 characters in body
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Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE, containing a logic puzzle that was first posted by Terence Tao.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit.

  1. the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit
  2. whether the MSE community considers me to be sexist for posting an answer to that question without preemptively anticipating what was "right" by adapting the gender references or refusing to answer in the first place

Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE, containing a logic puzzle that was first posted by Terence Tao.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on

  1. the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit
  2. whether the MSE community considers me to be sexist for posting an answer to that question without preemptively anticipating what was "right" by adapting the gender references or refusing to answer in the first place

Two days ago the question “The Bachelor Problem” (from Tao's Google+ account) was posted on MSE, containing a logic puzzle that was first posted by Terence Tao.

It received a lot of positive attention, solutions and comments until an MSE user voted to close on the basis that he considered the puzzle's references to male bachelors and female princesses to be sexism. A StackExchange employee (not active on MSE) stepped in and duly "corrected" the question as well as all its answers by replacing "bachelor" with "bachelorette", "princess" with "prince" and "sister" with "brother".

Feeling a rather awkward political uncertainty, I respectfully ask for clarification on the precise nature of the value added to the question and its answers by that edit.

2 deleted 100 characters in body
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    Post Reopened by user147263, Milo Brandt, Jonas Meyer, Pedro Tamaroff
    Post Closed as "off-topic" by Pedro Tamaroff
1
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