4 added 9 characters in body
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I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...feeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, until it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the ways questions are framed may impact women and girls, and to take seriously those who believe the original post reinforced sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she", my answers being "his" and not "hers", etc., and I'm not surprised anymore at the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance of and disinterest in women's UXexperiences on math.se.

I post this with a bit of trepidation.

Amy

I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...feeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, until it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the ways questions are framed may impact women and girls, and to take seriously those who believe the original post reinforced sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she", my answers being "his" and not "hers", etc., and I'm not surprised anymore at the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance of and disinterest in women's UX on math.se.

I post this with a bit of trepidation.

Amy

I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...feeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, until it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the ways questions are framed may impact women and girls, and to take seriously those who believe the original post reinforced sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she", my answers being "his" and not "hers", etc., and I'm not surprised anymore at the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance of and disinterest in women's experiences on math.se.

I post this with a bit of trepidation.

Amy

3 added 22 characters in body
source | link

I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...and in doing so, feelingfeeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, until it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least on one one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the wayways questions are framed may impact women and girls, and to take seriously those who believe the original post reinforced sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she" etc., my answers being "his" and not "hers", etc., and I'm not to mentionsurprised anymore at the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.$

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance of and disinterest in this community about women's UX on math.se.

I post this with a littlebit of trepidation,
Amy.

Amy

I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...and in doing so, feeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least on one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the way questions are framed may impact women and girls, and to take seriously those who believe the original post reinforced sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she" etc., etc., not to mention the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.$

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance and disinterest in this community about women's UX on math.se.

I post this with a little trepidation,
Amy

I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...feeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, until it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the ways questions are framed may impact women and girls, and to take seriously those who believe the original post reinforced sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she", my answers being "his" and not "hers", etc., and I'm not surprised anymore at the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance of and disinterest in women's UX on math.se.

I post this with a bit of trepidation.

Amy

2 added 4 characters in body
source | link

I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...and in doing so, feeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least on one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the way questions are framed may impact women and girls, and to take seriously those who findbelieve the original post to reinforcereinforced sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she" etc., etc., not to mention the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.$

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance and disinterest in this community about women's UX on math.se.

I post this with a little trepidation,
Amy

I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...and in doing so, feeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least on one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the way questions are framed may impact women and girls, and take seriously those who find the original post to reinforce sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she" etc., etc., not to mention the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.$

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance and disinterest in this community about women's UX on math.se.

I post this with a little trepidation,
Amy

I was going to just comment. Then, as writing a comment, it turned into two, then three...and in doing so, feeling a bit more courageous even as I typed, it evolved into an answer.

I found the edit to be both humorous and gratifying. No, I'm not the one who voted to close, nor did I find the original offensive. But I found it gratifying that on at least on one occasion, someone cared enough to actually consider how the way questions are framed may impact women and girls, and to take seriously those who believe the original post reinforced sexism.

The sad fact is that as a woman in mathematics, I have become so inured to being thanked as a "sir," being assumed to be a "he" and not a "she" etc., etc., not to mention the ways in women with female usernames are treated here, often, as I see it, not taken as seriously as those with "male" usernames.

I've had to learn to pick my battles, depending on context and depending on the consequences of speaking up. I've also learned that if I object 24/7, voicing every situation that is exclusive of women, doors are closed, and those to whom I speak stop listening. So I use my voice strategically, or so I aim. To be honest: MSE is not a place I find to be receptive to seriously considering the ways in which women are excluded in math, the ways in which the notion that "It's just plain fact that there are more men in math than women" is used to justify actions which ensure that "there are more men in math than women.$

I commend @Jaydless for actually stopping to consider the thoughts and feelings of users who actually happen to be women, and on a math site, no kidding! (Yes, we exist. Here.) If for nothing else, it is gratifying to know that at least one person at stackexchange took a moment to think about "the same ole same ole", and further, decided to make an edit, the consequences of which have revealed a lot of ignorance and disinterest in this community about women's UX on math.se.

I post this with a little trepidation,
Amy

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