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Yours was a bit of an edge case. The serial voting script runs early in the day (UTC, of course), and thus usually the votes it reverses are from the previous day. Then the reputation recalculation that happens on vote reversals finds out whether the reputation-cap kicked in and withheld reputation from other votes, and recalculates accordingly, so that afterwards it is as if "the serial upvotes never happened" - except that the entry in the reputation tab of the profile remains.

In your case, the serial voting occurred on the same day, before the script ran. When the script ran, you hadn't yet hit the reputation-cap, and for some reason, that led to the normal code still counting the votes towards the daily reputation-cap.

That's not a big problem, since on the next recalculation things are corrected. But when the next recalculation doesn't happen soon, the wrong reputation count persists for several days or even weeks.

You had no recalculation since the day of the serial voting, so the wrong score persisted until today. I triggered a recalculation by temporarily deleting this questionthis question of yours (and then a new recalculation by undeleting it again).

In this way, one can trigger a recalculation oneself (provided one has eligible posts), deleting or undeleting a post triggers a recalculation (maybe not if the deletion/undeletion doesn't cause a reputation change), so by temporarily deleting or undeleting a post one can bring one's reputation up-to-date (it takes several minutes until the recalculation occurs, so one has to wait a bit before undoing the temporary [un]deletion).

Yours was a bit of an edge case. The serial voting script runs early in the day (UTC, of course), and thus usually the votes it reverses are from the previous day. Then the reputation recalculation that happens on vote reversals finds out whether the reputation-cap kicked in and withheld reputation from other votes, and recalculates accordingly, so that afterwards it is as if "the serial upvotes never happened" - except that the entry in the reputation tab of the profile remains.

In your case, the serial voting occurred on the same day, before the script ran. When the script ran, you hadn't yet hit the reputation-cap, and for some reason, that led to the normal code still counting the votes towards the daily reputation-cap.

That's not a big problem, since on the next recalculation things are corrected. But when the next recalculation doesn't happen soon, the wrong reputation count persists for several days or even weeks.

You had no recalculation since the day of the serial voting, so the wrong score persisted until today. I triggered a recalculation by temporarily deleting this question of yours (and then a new recalculation by undeleting it again).

In this way, one can trigger a recalculation oneself (provided one has eligible posts), deleting or undeleting a post triggers a recalculation (maybe not if the deletion/undeletion doesn't cause a reputation change), so by temporarily deleting or undeleting a post one can bring one's reputation up-to-date (it takes several minutes until the recalculation occurs, so one has to wait a bit before undoing the temporary [un]deletion).

Yours was a bit of an edge case. The serial voting script runs early in the day (UTC, of course), and thus usually the votes it reverses are from the previous day. Then the reputation recalculation that happens on vote reversals finds out whether the reputation-cap kicked in and withheld reputation from other votes, and recalculates accordingly, so that afterwards it is as if "the serial upvotes never happened" - except that the entry in the reputation tab of the profile remains.

In your case, the serial voting occurred on the same day, before the script ran. When the script ran, you hadn't yet hit the reputation-cap, and for some reason, that led to the normal code still counting the votes towards the daily reputation-cap.

That's not a big problem, since on the next recalculation things are corrected. But when the next recalculation doesn't happen soon, the wrong reputation count persists for several days or even weeks.

You had no recalculation since the day of the serial voting, so the wrong score persisted until today. I triggered a recalculation by temporarily deleting this question of yours (and then a new recalculation by undeleting it again).

In this way, one can trigger a recalculation oneself (provided one has eligible posts), deleting or undeleting a post triggers a recalculation (maybe not if the deletion/undeletion doesn't cause a reputation change), so by temporarily deleting or undeleting a post one can bring one's reputation up-to-date (it takes several minutes until the recalculation occurs, so one has to wait a bit before undoing the temporary [un]deletion).

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Yours was a bit of an edge case. The serial voting script runs early in the day (UTC, of course), and thus usually the votes it reverses are from the previous day. Then the reputation recalculation that happens on vote reversals finds out whether the reputation-cap kicked in and withheld reputation from other votes, and recalculates accordingly, so that afterwards it is as if "the serial upvotes never happened" - except that the entry in the reputation tab of the profile remains.

In your case, the serial voting occurred on the same day, before the script ran. When the script ran, you hadn't yet hit the reputation-cap, and for some reason, that led to the normal code still counting the votes towards the daily reputation-cap.

That's not a big problem, since on the next recalculation things are corrected. But when the next recalculation doesn't happen soon, the wrong reputation count persists for several days or even weeks.

You had no recalculation since the day of the serial voting, so the wrong score persisted until today. I triggered a recalculation by temporarily deleting this question of yours (and then a new recalculation by undeleting it again).

In this way, one can trigger a recalculation oneself (provided one has eligible posts), deleting or undeleting a post triggers a recalculation (maybe not if the deletion/undeletion doesn't cause a reputation change), so by temporarily deleting or undeleting a post one can bring one's reputation up-to-date (it takes several minutes until the recalculation occurs, so one has to wait a bit before undoing the temporary [un]deletion).