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I was looking over the How to answerHow to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others agreed that it was not as helpful as it could be. And so we came up with a list of things that might improve that page Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of immediate context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoid readers' confusion and clarifies and distinguishes between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally undermine efforts to help the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

I was looking over the How to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others agreed that it was not as helpful as it could be. And so we came up with a list of things that might improve that page Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of immediate context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoid readers' confusion and clarifies and distinguishes between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally undermine efforts to help the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

I was looking over the How to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others agreed that it was not as helpful as it could be. And so we came up with a list of things that might improve that page Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of immediate context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoid readers' confusion and clarifies and distinguishes between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally undermine efforts to help the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

    Tweeted twitter.com/StackMath/status/830282914743070720
3 edited body
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I was looking over the How to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others agreed that it was not as helpful as it could be. And so we came up with a list of things that might improve yhatthat page Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of immediate context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoid readers' confusion and clarifies and distinguishes between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally undermine efforts to help the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

I was looking over the How to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others agreed that it was not as helpful as it could be. And so we came up with a list of things that might improve yhat page Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of immediate context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoid readers' confusion and clarifies and distinguishes between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally undermine efforts to help the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

I was looking over the How to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others agreed that it was not as helpful as it could be. And so we came up with a list of things that might improve that page Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of immediate context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoid readers' confusion and clarifies and distinguishes between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally undermine efforts to help the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

2 deleted 31 characters in body
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I was looking over the How to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others did not agreeagreed that it was not as helpful as it could be. At least, not as helpful as it could've been. And And so we came up with a list of things that might suit thatimprove yhat page better. Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of immediate context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoidsavoid readers' confusion to readers and clarifies and distinguishes between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally impactiveundermine efforts to help the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

I was looking over the How to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others did not agree that it was as helpful as it could be. At least, not as helpful as it could've been. And so we came up with a list of things that might suit that page better. Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoids confusion to readers and clarifies between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally impactive to the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

I was looking over the How to answer help page, and upon reading it, I and a few others agreed that it was not as helpful as it could be. And so we came up with a list of things that might improve yhat page Here's a list of what I think maybe should go on the help page:

  1. Answering good questions often gives good answers. Likewise, bad questions should be avoided from answering unless you can provide an answer that outweighs the question.

  2. We recommend you use English, as it is the language most users can read. If they can't read it, they can't like it.

  3. Refrain from making the fonts hard on the eyes. All caps, bold font, colored text, etc. should be avoided except for emphasis

  4. Understand the question. The deeper you can understand what is being asked, the deeper you can provide an answer, and that is almost always a good thing. If you don't understand something about the question, ask. A clearer understanding of the question saves misguided answers from happening.

  5. Stay on topic and think your answer all the way through before posting. Hints, for example, that are only dead-end paths will not make your answer useful.

  6. Be courteous. Treat everyone on an equal playing field, regardless of whether or not you may think they should already understand something.

  7. Watch the tags. Questions with tags you are familiar with are more likely to be answer-able by you, and it also helps cut down 'question searching time'.

  8. Learn from the comments and read other answers. It is usually the case that you are not the only one answering, and by learning from others, you can return the knowledge to produce better answers in the future.

  9. Look it up. Many problems have good related content from the internet that could improve your answer.

  10. We recommend pictures sometimes. While not necessary, it is like icing on a cake, and often times a picture is what was truly needed to answer the question.

  11. If you think something out of immediate context is needed in your answer, reference it. This helps avoid readers' confusion and clarifies and distinguishes between things that may be similar.

  12. KIS. Keep it simple. Unnecessarily complicated answers are less likely to be understood or fundamentally undermine efforts to help the OP.

  13. Use MathJax. Answers that don't use MathJax or use it incorrectly are subject not only to downvotes, but often times an unhappy crowd.

While not all of it should go on the page, I think there is a lot of useful content here. Feel free to edit this and add on.

1
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