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What is the difference between the tags and ?

At the moment, there are 678 questions678 questions with the tag, and 278 questions278 questions with the tag, and only 31 questions31 questions with both, so there seems to be perceived difference.

I'd like to point out that there was a different question (I think the most recent incarnation of this question, http://meta.math.stackexchange.com/questions/825/how-should-we-handle-tags-terminology-notation-definition, that was raised on meta two years ago. But as I read through, I thought there was a focus on keeping separated from the others (which I agree with - notation is different).

The wiki for says:

Questions on the usage and meaning of words in mathematics, the names for mathematical entities, and other such questions.

Interestingly, the tags and are tag-synonyms for . I see a big difference between etymology and definitions.

The wiki for is longer, and says:

Definitions are the core of mathematical precision; they come to answer "what is X" in mathematics. Into this category fit questions regarding equivalence of definitions; clarifications regarding complicated definitions; as well questions with purposed definitions for mathematical notions with requests for improvements or comments.

Perhaps these are clearly different to someone, but when I see something about "the meaning of words in mathematics... and other such questions" compared to looking at "what is 'X' in mathematics", they look about the same to me.

What is the difference between the tags and ?

At the moment, there are 678 questions with the tag, and 278 questions with the tag, and only 31 questions with both, so there seems to be perceived difference.

I'd like to point out that there was a different question (I think the most recent incarnation of this question, http://meta.math.stackexchange.com/questions/825/how-should-we-handle-tags-terminology-notation-definition, that was raised on meta two years ago. But as I read through, I thought there was a focus on keeping separated from the others (which I agree with - notation is different).

The wiki for says:

Questions on the usage and meaning of words in mathematics, the names for mathematical entities, and other such questions.

Interestingly, the tags and are tag-synonyms for . I see a big difference between etymology and definitions.

The wiki for is longer, and says:

Definitions are the core of mathematical precision; they come to answer "what is X" in mathematics. Into this category fit questions regarding equivalence of definitions; clarifications regarding complicated definitions; as well questions with purposed definitions for mathematical notions with requests for improvements or comments.

Perhaps these are clearly different to someone, but when I see something about "the meaning of words in mathematics... and other such questions" compared to looking at "what is 'X' in mathematics", they look about the same to me.

What is the difference between the tags and ?

At the moment, there are 678 questions with the tag, and 278 questions with the tag, and only 31 questions with both, so there seems to be perceived difference.

I'd like to point out that there was a different question (I think the most recent incarnation of this question, http://meta.math.stackexchange.com/questions/825/how-should-we-handle-tags-terminology-notation-definition, that was raised on meta two years ago. But as I read through, I thought there was a focus on keeping separated from the others (which I agree with - notation is different).

The wiki for says:

Questions on the usage and meaning of words in mathematics, the names for mathematical entities, and other such questions.

Interestingly, the tags and are tag-synonyms for . I see a big difference between etymology and definitions.

The wiki for is longer, and says:

Definitions are the core of mathematical precision; they come to answer "what is X" in mathematics. Into this category fit questions regarding equivalence of definitions; clarifications regarding complicated definitions; as well questions with purposed definitions for mathematical notions with requests for improvements or comments.

Perhaps these are clearly different to someone, but when I see something about "the meaning of words in mathematics... and other such questions" compared to looking at "what is 'X' in mathematics", they look about the same to me.

2 edited title
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Difference between [tag:definition][definition] and [tag:terminology][terminology]

1
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Difference between [tag:definition] and [tag:terminology]

What is the difference between the tags and ?

At the moment, there are 678 questions with the tag, and 278 questions with the tag, and only 31 questions with both, so there seems to be perceived difference.

I'd like to point out that there was a different question (I think the most recent incarnation of this question, http://meta.math.stackexchange.com/questions/825/how-should-we-handle-tags-terminology-notation-definition, that was raised on meta two years ago. But as I read through, I thought there was a focus on keeping separated from the others (which I agree with - notation is different).

The wiki for says:

Questions on the usage and meaning of words in mathematics, the names for mathematical entities, and other such questions.

Interestingly, the tags and are tag-synonyms for . I see a big difference between etymology and definitions.

The wiki for is longer, and says:

Definitions are the core of mathematical precision; they come to answer "what is X" in mathematics. Into this category fit questions regarding equivalence of definitions; clarifications regarding complicated definitions; as well questions with purposed definitions for mathematical notions with requests for improvements or comments.

Perhaps these are clearly different to someone, but when I see something about "the meaning of words in mathematics... and other such questions" compared to looking at "what is 'X' in mathematics", they look about the same to me.