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Suppose I want to search for instances where an expression similar to $x_n^2-x_{n-1}x_{n+1}$ shows up. How would I do that?

I suppose the question goes beyond searching MSE. Are there search engines which handle math formulas in a particularly effective way?

Edit: I am listing some leads in the comments which I found useful:

Uniquation, a mathematical formula search engine. And here is the response to my query above. Perhaps this can be an option on MSE.

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See my side-project, it is an open-source math-aware similarity search engine.

http://approach0.xyz

I am hoping someone interested can join and form a community to push this project forward, this is the reason I am posting here.

If you are interested at this project, please follow it on twitter: https://twitter.com/approach0. Approach0 will post updates there.

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searchOnMath looks interesting too. I think you can do what you want

Feb. 2019 Update from one the developers Flavio Gonzaga:

Recently our tool has indexed both: Mathematics and MathOverflow.

Currently, SearchOnMath is the mathematical search engine with the largest number of indexed sites (including Wikipedia, Wolfram MathWorld, among others ...).

P.S.: please, enclose formulas between \${}\$. e.g. \${x+y}\$.

The following Youtube video illustrates how it works: SearchOnMath - a brief guide

We’d love to hear your feedback.

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    $\begingroup$ Is there a search that when you look for $x^y=y^x$ it provides articles with equivalent equations that can be obtained by simple substitutions, such as $a^b=b^a$. That is a search engine that understands the concept of equation beyond just appearance of letters. SearchOnMath is a valuable tool but I do not think it searches for equivalent equations. $\endgroup$ – Maesumi May 30 '15 at 21:07
  • $\begingroup$ According to a recent announcement on Mathematics Meta, SearchOnMath now indexes MathOverflow and Mathematics Stack Exchange. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Feb 1 at 5:10

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