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I'm studying a book of commutative algebra that I'm having some troubles with. I realized in the chapter I'm reading that I have some doubts in the proofs. I've already asked two of these ones, but I don't want to flood the site with little doubts of a specific book. I don't know what to do, this site really changed my life mathematically speaking, but I don't want to flood MSE and be boring.

What's the policy about this?

Thanks a lot!

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    $\begingroup$ I think you shouldn't worry too much about flooding the site, but instead make sure you're really putting in the effort. If you read through part of the book, come across a proof you don't fully understand, the first step is to really try to understand the proof. Maybe look up other proofs, seeing if they show you the light. Write things down. But put in the effort. If it turns out you still have doubts, ask a question! But be sure to write what you've thought, how your doubt holds up against other proofs, etc. Adding high quality questions won't hurt the site. $\endgroup$
    – davidlowryduda Mod
    Jul 4 '13 at 16:31
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    $\begingroup$ In addition, there are automatic question asking limits in place, so I wouldn't worry too much about sudden floods either. You can't ask more than 6 questions per day, or more than 50 per month. Ah - and I have yet another thing to say. It seems you are going through Hungerford - it's nice to mention the source of a question when you ask it. So be sure to credit Hungerford for making you think if you ask about his work $\endgroup$
    – davidlowryduda Mod
    Jul 4 '13 at 16:31
  • $\begingroup$ @mixedmath I really put in the effort, this you can be sure. Speaking of the book I'm using, I was studying Hugenford's book, but now I'm studying right now steps in commutative algebra by Sharp. Thank you for your comments. $\endgroup$
    – user75086
    Jul 4 '13 at 16:44
  • $\begingroup$ There used to be commutative algebra chatroom, but it seems to be inactive for quite a long time. $\endgroup$ Jul 5 '13 at 5:38
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This is acceptable, so long as you put forth some effort to understand the proof before resorting to this site for help. Please include this work in your question post, so we can "get inside your head" and understand how you're looking at the problem. If you do that, you should be fine.

Anyhow, the rate-limits will make sure that you can't really "flood" Math.SE; but some time between questions is nice.

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