2
$\begingroup$

I have asked three questions till now and till now have got got not a single answer on either and the number of views are very low. I was able to solve the first two myself after some reading and brain storming but still the views on it are very low.

What is the correct way to ask questions so that it reaches its audience. The link to the latest question is here.

Kindly tell me how to improve this so I learn in the future.

$\endgroup$
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I think that's mostly because your question is not self-contained and your description of the problem is a bit too crude. $\endgroup$ – user1551 Nov 11 '13 at 9:55
7
$\begingroup$

As mentioned in the comments the problem with your latest question, and possibly the others too, is that it's not self-contained and that your description of the problem is a bit too crude.

The question can be significantly improved by

  • incorporating the two method descriptions in the question, rather than just linking to external websites. The links can be kept, but as references only. This way, your question looks more interesting, is easier to understand and, more importantly, becomes self-contained. We all know that external links may eventually break, and then your question would be worthless to future users.
  • providing more details about your specific problem.
    • "The first source seems to be incorrect cause when I calculate it using matlab it comes to be different from what they have given as the answer." How is it different? What's the source for the "answer"? Show your data and your work!
    • "As for the second link I cant understand that cause its not completely explaining as to how to calculate." What exactly can't you understand? Provide the details of the method (as mentioned above), and specify where you're lost.

To sum up: help other people help you!

Note that editing the question will bump it to the list of active questions, and this may draw more attention to it. If you still don't get any answers, you can put a bounty on it.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks a lot! I would keep all that in mind. Right now it seems I got an answer from an external source though :P More like I'm just playing around until I actually get the answer. $\endgroup$ – Sohaib I Nov 11 '13 at 13:49
  • $\begingroup$ However some of my other questions have no external links and I think are explained in a quite self contained manner like the question on Probability Distribution. $\endgroup$ – Sohaib I Nov 11 '13 at 13:56

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .