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I am reading a textbook in which I find a writing problem:

Squaring them produces the $(n/2)$nd roots of unity.

My question:

Which one is correct? $(n/2)$nd or $(n/2)$th?

Can I ask such question on math.se?

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    $\begingroup$ I would lean towards yes, perhaps with the (terminology) tag. $\endgroup$ – Alex Becker Apr 6 '14 at 7:05
  • $\begingroup$ Yes!"Terminology" is what I am looking for. $\endgroup$ – John Hass Apr 6 '14 at 7:13
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    $\begingroup$ Maybe English.SE is a reasonable candidate for this question? It seems similar to this question (k+1)th or (k+1)st? $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Apr 6 '14 at 8:25
  • $\begingroup$ I'll add a link to the question on the main: math.stackexchange.com/questions/741801/… (At the moment, it has 3 votes to close as off-topic.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Apr 6 '14 at 8:26
  • $\begingroup$ @MartinSleziak Your link is very helpful:) $\endgroup$ – John Hass Apr 6 '14 at 8:30
  • $\begingroup$ As I see, the same question was also asked here: math.stackexchange.com/questions/55200/k1th-k1st-k-th1-or-k1 $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Apr 6 '14 at 11:47
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    $\begingroup$ @MartinSleziak My question is put on hold, but the same question you mentioned is allowed. I am queit confused about whether or not this kind of question can be asked. $\endgroup$ – John Hass Apr 6 '14 at 12:32
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    $\begingroup$ Perhaps it can be asked if the calendar has number 2011, but not if it has 2014. These are two different sites we are talking about, MSE2011 versus MSE2014. That said, I think the question is reasonable, but it may be a duplicate of the earlier one. $\endgroup$ – user127096 Apr 6 '14 at 15:54
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The OP has already posted a question on main: Which one is correct? $(n/2)$nd or $(n/2)$th?
But it was closed quite quickly as off-topic.

I think the question should be reopened (and I will cast my reopen vote):

  • A very similar question was asked here before and was not closed: (k+1)th, (k+1)st, k-th+1, or k+1?
  • I think the question is interesting for people studying mathematics.
  • When a similar question was asked on English.SE, in [a comment] it was suggested that: Because this is localized to mathematics, it might be worthwhile trying it on the math.SE site.

(I am aware that I could/should have posted the reopen request in the thread for reopen requests. But since this question already has its own thread and since there might be some discussion whether it is on-topic or not, I thought that this might be a better place.)

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