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I'm interested in finding a solution to this question for the non trivial cases. When the OP first wrote the question, it included the possibility of trivial cases, and as such the answers received merely pointed that out. In the comments, the OP then said that s/he would like to ignore the trivial cases, but did not edit the question.

If I am interested in having this question answered, what should I do? Possible options are to

  • Ask a new question, better explaining the problem
  • Edit the original question, perhaps adding a bounty

In general, what is the best practice in situations like this - where a question has been asked and not adequately answered. If, say, one does not one to put a bounty on the question, is it acceptable to re-ask the question?

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    $\begingroup$ I say post a new question with the best information you have. People were screwing around with a problem on MO, I restated it and put in lots of work, it remains my most popular question. Still open, by the way. $\endgroup$ – Will Jagy Aug 4 '14 at 22:30
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    $\begingroup$ You could also bounty it asking for an additional answer that includes non-trivial cases. I sometimes do this when I feel an answer with some particular flavor would add value to the question, even though it has good answers already. $\endgroup$ – Alexander Gruber Aug 4 '14 at 23:35
  • $\begingroup$ @AlexanderGruber - I feel that's a good answer where the original question is well posed. However, in this case, I don't think that is the case. Do you think that editing the original question and adding a bounty would be preferable to posting a new question? $\endgroup$ – Mathmo123 Aug 4 '14 at 23:36
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    $\begingroup$ @Mathmo123 Opening a new question would be preferable to editing the old one, as there is already an answer (a good answer) to the old question as it was stated. In absence of a bounty, that's what I'd recommend. $\endgroup$ – Alexander Gruber Aug 4 '14 at 23:39
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I agree with @WillJagy: post a new question.

(Of course, it may be helpful to preemptively defend against trigger-happy closevoters.)

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