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My main concern that question I posted over at MSE (view here)

is just too trivial, so no one is bothered to even answer. Perhaps it is also my fault for not being clear enough, even though I tried my best. Do you have any suggestions on how I can edit my question so I can maybe receive some decent answers before the bounty has run out?

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  • $\begingroup$ Why the down-votes? $\endgroup$ – Emir Šemšić Dec 10 '15 at 9:10
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    $\begingroup$ You could make clearer (regarding this meta Question) exactly what the timeline is, e.g. when did you create the bounty and how much later was your post here on meta? At what point did the two answers appear? As far as the main Question goes, it would help if you indicated your own understanding of what aspects of contour integration are "typical tactics" and what seems to you of particular ingenuity in the specific application. Personally these always seem to have been made to appear by magic, but (as with epsilon-delta proofs) some repeated exposure helps make them more familiar. $\endgroup$ – hardmath Dec 11 '15 at 14:57
  • $\begingroup$ This might be interesting for you: How effective are bounties? $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Dec 11 '15 at 16:10
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The bounty process isn't that fast. If the questions didn't receive answers when it was posted, it probably means it is too difficult/requires a background knowledge not many people possess/etc. When a bounty is awarded, chances of you getting a good answer rise, but you have to be patient. The bounty process doesn't guarantee instant answers: if a question is able to be answered fast, it usually is answered way before the bounty starts.

In fact, looking at it now, I see two answers.

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