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This question already has an answer here:

I have had trouble trying to express a sigma sum formula.

Please do not think I have been lazy, I have been lazy, it is just I have up attempting to work it out after over 2 hours (when my actual question still remains to be written).

I was intending to specify a sigma with a variable ( n) at the top right of it And a (i=1) on the bottom right of the sigma. I have made many attempts, but I cannot have an "=" expression instead of a simple variable (like i on its own).

Many thanks

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marked as duplicate by user296602, user147263, Shailesh, user99914, Surb Jan 19 '16 at 7:28

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migrated from math.stackexchange.com Jan 18 '16 at 19:35

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I think you want something like this $$\sum_{i=1}^n a_n.$$

This is given by \sum_{i=1}^n a_n.

Formatting tips here.

If you omit the curly braces, then characters will be omitted. For example Notice the difference when I write \frac123 $$\frac123$$ versus \frac{1}{23} $$\frac{1}{23}$$.

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  • $\begingroup$ Much appreciated, thank you for offering that. $\endgroup$ – Mr a Jan 18 '16 at 18:45
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It sounds like your are looking for the code for $\sum_{i=1}^n$, which is $\sum_{i=1}^n$.

The point here is that the command _ which makes the lower index just takes the first character of some larger text unless you put curly brackets around the whole text. The same is true for ^.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks that was exactly what I was trying to achieve. I made the mistake of having them both I seperate pairs of brackets. $\endgroup$ – Mr a Jan 18 '16 at 18:44
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 \sum\limits_{i=1}^{\infty}

$\sum\limits_{i=1}^{\infty}$


if you want a bigger sigma so

 \displaystyle\sum\limits_{i=1}^{\infty}

$\displaystyle\sum\limits_{i=1}^{\infty} $

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  • $\begingroup$ There are also \sum_{i=1}^{\infty} and \displaystyle\sum_{i=1}^{\infty} giving $\sum_{i=1}^{\infty}$ and $\displaystyle\sum_{i=1}^{\infty}$ $\endgroup$ – Henry Jan 19 '16 at 10:51
  • $\begingroup$ Please never ever use \displaystyle or \limits in inline math. It looks horrible. $\endgroup$ – Najib Idrissi Jan 19 '16 at 11:01
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    $\begingroup$ @NajibIdrissi I think that it looks good, but it is your right to think what ever you want $\endgroup$ – 3SAT Jan 19 '16 at 11:06
  • $\begingroup$ Okay... $\endgroup$ – Najib Idrissi Jan 19 '16 at 11:11

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