When I see the questions list, I see the questions with number of answers. Some of them (the numbers) are in green background and others are against normal white background. What is the difference? If I take that as the approved/accepted answer by the OP, can he/she accept more than one answer?

The background is green if OP has accepted an answer, and gray if OP hasn't. In some lists the green number is the score (upvotes - downvotes) of the question. (For example, linked questions, related questions and shorter list in user profile.) In some lists the green number is the number of answers. (For example, list of questions, front page or questions tab in user profile.)

No, OP cannot accept more than one answer, that defeats the whole purpose of it.

  • I'm downvoting this because it conflicts with What do the green boxes mean? The current question is about the home page, not the lists of related questions or lists in one's profile. – ahorn Sep 19 '16 at 9:55
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    I have edited your question to address that the green number is not always score. (This was pointed out in previous comment.) I hope it's ok - of course, feel free to edit the post further or rever my edit, if needed. I am not sure whether list of answers (here or here) should be mentioned too - the OP specifically asks about lists of questions. – Martin Sleziak Sep 19 '16 at 19:32
  • @MartinSleziak The edit is fine, thanks. – Najib Idrissi Sep 20 '16 at 7:44

Under the home page tabs, the box displaying the count of the number of answers is shaded green when there is an accepted answer. Only one answer can be accepted by the OP.

It looks like in this example (I will add link to the question as well):

Preview of a question

Or in some lists the question is shown without the preview of the beginning of the post:

Another screenshot of the same question

You can see there two numbers. The number 41 is score (number of upvotes minus number of downvotes). The number which is highlighted in green is number of answers.

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