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When voting for closing/reopening a question, or for deleting it, for how long can other users see it in the review queues?

What's going on with other types of votes: low quality answer, for instance. What about the suggested edits?

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  • $\begingroup$ I hope it's clear what I wanted to ask. I'm not very familiar with the terminology of the non-mathematical part of M.SE, so if someone can improve my question is free to do it. $\endgroup$ – user26857 May 9 '16 at 13:13
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    $\begingroup$ I guess that the answer is probably "until the review is completed", which may take a few minutes or a few hours, or theoretically a few years. $\endgroup$ – Asaf Karagila May 9 '16 at 13:18
  • $\begingroup$ @AsafKaragila Maybe you are right. I've also noticed that after a while (I have no idea how many days!) one can vote again if the question is still not closed, let's say. $\endgroup$ – user26857 May 9 '16 at 13:20
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by "review room"? Are you talking about questions which are offered for you to review? BTW users with sufficient reputation can see the completed reviews in the review history. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 9 '16 at 14:25
  • $\begingroup$ BTW there is no "delete review queue" (as far as I know). But it is possible to choose "delete" in low quality posts review. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 9 '16 at 14:28
  • $\begingroup$ @MartinSleziak I see. Thanks for the links. $\endgroup$ – user26857 May 9 '16 at 14:29
  • $\begingroup$ @Asaf it's more complicated than that as VTC rot away after some time at which point the item leaves the close queue. $\endgroup$ – quid May 9 '16 at 14:35
  • $\begingroup$ @quid: So what happens if there is always just two or three closing votes? Every time one rots away, another one is cast from the review queue, but every other time everyone skips. $\endgroup$ – Asaf Karagila May 9 '16 at 15:07
  • $\begingroup$ @Martin There is also the Moderation tools tab (10k+) where one can see recent deletion votes and the posts with the highest number of them. $\endgroup$ – Lord_Farin May 9 '16 at 16:44
  • $\begingroup$ @Lord_Farin I am aware of that. But this post mentioned delete votes and review queues close to each other, it sounded to me like they are considered to be the same thing. I thought that a clarification of this would be useful. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak May 9 '16 at 16:50
  • $\begingroup$ @Asaf I suppose in this case the item stays in the queue; I am not certain if there is some criteirion. But this was not my point. Once all votes aged away the item leaves the queue while its review was never completed. Thus, there is another way to leave the queue beside the review being completed. The item being deleted or locked are likely still other ones. (This could be fun to test.) Thus it is more complicated. $\endgroup$ – quid May 9 '16 at 16:51
  • $\begingroup$ @quid: Yes, I understood that. But being a mathematician, I couldn't resist the urge to describe an unlikely scenario that will constitute a counterexample to what you said. :-) $\endgroup$ – Asaf Karagila May 9 '16 at 18:09
  • $\begingroup$ When users are removed, are their votes-to-close and votes-to-delete also removed? Do all the posts that were closed and/or deleted on their votes return from the dead? $\endgroup$ – Gerry Myerson May 9 '16 at 23:04
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    $\begingroup$ @GerryMyerson No to both. For the second question, the only change is that the username of the voter is then displayed differently. It is not hard to find examples of this. For the first, as far as I know, the votes are transferred to the Community user and if they should take effect they are then displayed as such, i.e., being cast by Community. $\endgroup$ – quid May 10 '16 at 8:39
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As Asaf said usually items stay in a queue until the "review task" is "completed" (not for some period of time). What exactly this means varies depending on the queue.

For the "close queue" the main "exit" scenarios are:

  1. The question gets closed.
  2. The questions gets three "leave open." (Or, the questions gets edited from the queue).

Until one of these happens the item usually stays in the queue.

It is however also possible that the question leaves the queue because it has no reason to be there anymore. That is, it has not active close votes or flags anymore, as the existing ones aged away or got redacted (see below).

Further reasons for a question to leave the queue include, the question getting deleted or locked or likely also it getting bountied, so making them ineligible for closing to begin with.

Once the item is outside the queue it can be put back in via a fresh vote to close. See also What governs whether I see a post in the Close Votes review queue?

That one can cast a vote to close again is a bit orthogonal. A vote to close that did not result in closure is as mentioned above discarded under certain criteria, based on number of views, the review queue, and the time.

Such a vote that aged away can be recast after some time. I believe two weeks after it disappeared, which often makes it often about two and a half since one cast it. See Age close votes after 14 days, regardless of views, allowing recasting for related info.

The situation for other queues is similar.

For "reopen" it is about the converse of "close."

A suggested edit can be applied, (applied with modification,) or rejected. Until one of these actions happens due to the votes of the reviewers, or other actions (like a conflicting edit) the suggestion stays pending in the queue. The standard threshold is two votes (in favor or against); there are some exceptions to this.

An item stays in the low-quality queue until it is deleted or found good enough (or edited). And so on.

This situation means that the queues could get clogged with some items. But so far its fine. Yet, indeed, for close votes on SO there used to be a problem, and as a response the aging-away criteria got adapted.

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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the answer. $\endgroup$ – user26857 May 9 '16 at 20:10

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