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Earlier this month, I asked this question regarding the interchange between the summation and derivative in my given example. When I went to the reputation tab, I saw this: "bug" in reputation tab

I went to the question where it was considered removed, but found out that it wasn't removed in the first place. I believe there was a bug in the reputation count. I thinks lots of other people have experienced this "bug". Can anyone describe what happened here?

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    $\begingroup$ There's a deleted answer that you probably downvoted, that was removed by its poster on June 13. The +1 is because you got your reputation back. $\endgroup$ – user296602 Jun 16 '16 at 21:32
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    $\begingroup$ When I look at the reputation tab on your personal page I see the message "There were no reputation changes on this day". So it is something the public is not meant to see. That is usually a downvote. It looks like you downvoted somebody else's answer, and that answer was then deleted. The downvote cost you 1 point rep, but that was refunded when the post was deleted. $\endgroup$ – Jyrki Lahtonen Jun 16 '16 at 21:32
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From How does "Reputation" work:

You gain reputation when:

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  • you remove a downvote from an answer: +1
  • an answer you downvoted is removed: +1

No other events cause a +1.

The first one will appear as 'undownvote' in your reputation tab; the second one as 'removed'. So as Jyrki Lahtonen mentioned, you downvoted one of the answers and it was removed on June 13th, giving you the 1 reputation back which you 'spent' when downvoting.

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  • $\begingroup$ I already realized this. Thanks anyways. $\endgroup$ – Obinna Nwakwue Apr 16 '17 at 18:23
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    $\begingroup$ @ObinnaNwakwue I think that it is good that an answer to your inquiry is documented here - it might help other users who might come to meta searching for the answer to the same problem. (So perhaps it is good thing to have an answer, even it it comes one year after the question was posted - mainly for future reference.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Apr 17 '17 at 9:49

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