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The current definition of "integration" in the integration tag is "All aspects of integration, including the definition of the integral and computing indefinite integrals (antiderivatives)."

The question "How to integrate simple discrete function" was tagged as "integration" and I rettaged it as "discrete-mathematics". In a comment I was asked why.

The question deals with a discrete integral. Since I am unsure I ask:

Should discrete integrals be tagged as "integration" too?

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    $\begingroup$ I agree with your action; the "discrete integral" is very nonstandard terminology, and is only related to the standard notions of integration through analogy. $\endgroup$
    – user856
    Commented Jun 21, 2011 at 2:30
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    $\begingroup$ Maybe "sequences-and-series"? $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 21, 2011 at 9:17

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In a prior question I proposed that these be tagged with their standard terminology: definite or indefinite integral or sum. I don't think it is wise to overload the integral tag to subsume the discrete case (sums). Nor does there appear to be a need for a unified "sum or integral" tag, since one can always form their union when need be (searches, RSS feeds, etc). However, as I argued in said thread, I do think it is important to add tags to distinguish definite vs. indefinite integrals and sums since such information is difficult if not impossible to automatically deduce for searches etc.

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Since there are no answers and I agree with Rahul Narain's comment

(...) the "discrete integral" is very nonstandard terminology, and is only related to the standard notions of integration through analogy.

I will keep the "discrete-mathematics" tag of the question on the main site as it is.

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  • $\begingroup$ Américo, I think you can safely accept this answer. $\endgroup$
    – t.b.
    Commented Jun 27, 2011 at 13:15
  • $\begingroup$ @Theo, done. Thanks! $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 27, 2011 at 13:54
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No. In the Math Subject Classification http://www.ams.org/mathscinet/searchMSC.html we find that the calculus of finite differences is in section 39, Finite Differences and Functional Equations, but integration is in sections 26,27,28, and 30. And of course "integral" is in a lot of other sections, since it means something involving integers!

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