-2
$\begingroup$

I have a question about my Mathematics Stack Exchange post: How can I draw a 10 unit long line?

So, as you can see, it's on hold/closed, and if you look at the comments I asked why it's unclear but didn't get a reply.

I don't know how it's unclear, or what can be done to make it clearer. Surely if people were able to answer it, then it's clear?

Is it the redundancy that is bad? ("<stuff with x> that uses only x")

If it's not the redundancy, is it the question's length? It's a quite short question but I'd think that's still fine?

Did I tag it wrong? Should I not have mentioned plotting at all?

$\endgroup$
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ It will very often happen that because the problem is clear to you, you assume it will be equally clear to your Readers. In a Comment there you wrote that "To put it simple, I wanna describe $0<=x<=10$ with an equation." As you seem to know, that is a (pair of) inequalities, and it's unclear why you expect (or want) to replace them with an equation. A start might be to edit your Question to express the problem in terms similar to your "simple" Comment. $\endgroup$ – hardmath Sep 30 '16 at 11:18
1
$\begingroup$

I imagine part the issue is that the question reeks of an XY problem — you have some particular thing (the X) you're interested in, and you have some vague idea (the Y) about how to do it, and you proceed to ask questions about Y, rather than X.

Consequently, the question you have asked appears rather strange — especially if the answers you got really are the sort of thing you were asking for, which don't appear to actually have any bearing on your stated topic of interest.

But if nothing else, the apparent strangeness can make readers think they haven't understood the question — especially without there being context motivating it — which leads to the judgment that the question is unclear.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .