20
$\begingroup$

I have thought of a puzzle that I'd like to see the result of about primes. To continue my investigation I need some computer programming. I have absolutely no experience or even know which program could help. I am able to detail the puzzle so that someone could continue if they wished but am unsure whether or not this was appropriate? Thanks. Sorry this should be on maths meta.

$\endgroup$

migrated from meta.matheducators.stackexchange.com Dec 24 '16 at 13:41

This question came from our discussion, support, and feature requests site for those involved in the field of teaching mathematics.

  • $\begingroup$ In hindsight, your question was not about programming. It was about a particular graph of an abstract (yet un-formalized) discrete function. So, in reality, you allowing computers to be used is no different than using a graphing calculator. I'm merely posting this for future readers as I've seen your resulting question. $\endgroup$ – The Great Duck Jan 1 '17 at 1:52
25
$\begingroup$

I don't think there is a principle problem against questions and answers which involve programming. Some mathematicians do a lot of programming as part of their work.

The issue here is the question being on-topic. Namely, it has to be about the mathematics, and not about the implementation. It should be about the general idea behind the algorithm, rather than how to write that algorithm in a specific language.

I find the above to be a generally good outline for CAS (Computer Algebra System) related questions as well, with the small caveat that we can be a bit more lenient about implementation question, as long as they are honestly mathematical (and not, for example, "I tried to run sqrt[2] and it failed, what am I doing wrong" type of tech support).

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks. I'll post it as it is definitely mathematical in content. $\endgroup$ – Karl Dec 24 '16 at 15:27

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .