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I posted 2 questions a week ago:

1) https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/2094489/probability-of-defects-in-a-product-with-multiple-phases-of-product-quality-chec

2) https://math.stackexchange.com/questions/2094442/combination-of-poisson-and-binomial-distribution-on-the-number-of-cars-passing-t

I now know that the solution in my original post is correct (we did this in class). What is the best way to go about this? Should I just answer it with "The solution in the original post is correct" and then accept it?

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    $\begingroup$ Posts like those two, where you essentially put an answer in the question, are difficult for others to answer. There is no explicit "question" in the posts, so it isn't clear what you really want to learn. So, if you do have the correct answer, what would someone else say - just "the answer in the question seems correct"? Usually, if you have a solution, you can try to get better answers by just asking about the part that you are most unsure about. The real purpose of this site is for questions for which you don't have the answer or specific issues that you're unsure about. $\endgroup$ – Carl Mummert Jan 19 '17 at 13:50
  • $\begingroup$ I understand what you're saying but sometimes I just want to check if my solution is correct. Will keep this in mind though. $\endgroup$ – Yos Jan 19 '17 at 13:57
  • $\begingroup$ You could do as you propose. Another way would be to edit the question so it just has the question part, and then post the solution part as an answer (but don't do this if it makes nonsense out of any answers or comments other users have made – I haven't actually looked at your links to see whether this applies). $\endgroup$ – Gerry Myerson Jan 19 '17 at 23:08

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