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This question is an exact duplicate of:

Is that question: https://math.stackexchange.com/q/2121387/378968 so bad that don't worth an answer?

It was marked as off-topic, I edited it but nothing happened. If someone think it could be improved, could this person help me with the edit?

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marked as duplicate by Joel Reyes Noche, Watson, Shailesh, Bill Dubuque, BLAZE Feb 11 '17 at 20:50

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

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    $\begingroup$ Why have two meta threads about a single reopening request, when we normally do with one thread for 179 (and counting) such requests. $\endgroup$ – Jyrki Lahtonen Feb 10 '17 at 18:22
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    $\begingroup$ @JyrkiLahtonen The OP said in this comment that the other post is not about the specific question, but rather about process of reopening in general. (Based on which is seems to me that it might be considered a duplicate of another post linked there in a comment.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Feb 10 '17 at 19:21
  • $\begingroup$ this question is a duplicate of a question that does not exist anymore $\endgroup$ – miracle173 Dec 1 '17 at 1:14
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The way you posed the question is as one about software, not about Mathematics. So, yeah, off-topic is appropriate here.

The question is repairable, however. Why not explain what the various ODE options are in Matlab and given those, which ones are most appropriate in terms of error, speed, and so on?

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As presently worded your Question asks, "Which MATLAB equation solver is more suitable?" Yet you have not shared the specifics of the ODE (system?) you want to solve.

The usual dictum is that a Question asking about how to perform a specific mathematical task (eg. solve this ODE) using software can be on-topic here. On the other hand Questions about the software per se (errors, performance, etc.) are considered off-topic.

A look at the Related Questions listed in the sidebar of your Question will help to illustrate the distinction.

Asking about the "best" of anything is not as cogent as asking what the criteria are for deciding between options. The reason Matlab and similar packages provide more than one ODE solver is because there is no single best algorithm. There is a long history of such algorithms and a discussion of all the shortcomings one might encounter would be too broad for a good treatment. Instead, consider a one semester course in numerical methods.

In the short term I would recommend revamping the Question to focus on a specific ODE you want to solve (and how to do it with Matlab).

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  • $\begingroup$ consider a one semester course in numerical methods is the worst way you can say I'm an ignorant on the subject. Did you take that course? Could you, please, reference a good book instead, or tell me which kind of course (and University perhaps) you were thinking on when you say something like that? This could improve the answer. Thanks you anyway. $\endgroup$ – Ernesto Iglesias Feb 13 '17 at 12:49
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    $\begingroup$ Ernesto, I'm not trying to improve my answer or suggest your ignorance but rather ways you can ask in a more on-topic way. Understanding what various ODE algorithms have been implemented and the occasions for their use is a worthy mathematical pursuit. An introductory undergraduate course on numerical methods will follow numerical integration with a brief treatment of ODE solvers. I've taught such a class from Burden and Faires Numerical Analysis, where see Chapt. 5, Initial Value Problems for ODEs. $\endgroup$ – hardmath Feb 13 '17 at 14:28

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