This question already has an answer here:

Plus-on-up and minus-on-down

Plus-Minus. Means a quantity of same magnitude can have either a positive or a negative value. As commonly found in square roots such as

$$\sqrt[2]{625}= +-25$$.

Here is an Wikipedia SVG-example of a basic trigonometry formula:

sin theta equals to plusminus Sqrt over whole 1 minus cos square theta.

How to render it using MathJax?

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ALSO;

Also I've seen use of minus-plus, i.e. minus-plus.

I can't remember specific example but it was probably in some chemistry related text, in a situation; two variables (say $x$ and $y$) each have positive and negative value. But if $x$ is positive then $y$ is negative, and if $x$ is negative then $y$ is positive.

Don't know whether the second one is standard or not; but if the second-one is standard or allowed in MathJax; how to use it in MathJax formatting??

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PS. I've gone through MathJax basic tutorial and quick reference and also seen Google but could not find.

marked as duplicate by quid, Community May 21 '17 at 12:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 6
    \pm and \mp – Daniel Fischer May 21 '17 at 12:39
  • Great. You should publish it as answer and I'm accepting it. – Always Confused May 21 '17 at 12:40
  • @DanielFischer: Sorry didn't see your comment before I posted my answer – Thomas May 21 '17 at 12:41
  • 2
    It is in the tutorial, point 12. – quid May 21 '17 at 12:48
  • @quid Can't find there. Mentioned in PostScript. – Always Confused May 21 '17 at 12:51
  • Accepted as duplicate "that solved my purpose". But It is quite hard to find there. it has been also mixed up with division sign. – Always Confused May 21 '17 at 12:56
  • 2
    It's alright you asked the question. I agree it's not that easy to find there. I still feel it should be closed as dupe for systematic reasons. Down the road your Q will still serve as useful sign-post for future user having had the same problem. – quid May 21 '17 at 13:05
  • 3
    Detextify is helpful for this and similar questions. – Clarinetist May 22 '17 at 12:48
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You can use $$ \pm $$ or $$ \mp $$ That is

\pm

or

\mp

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