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I recently asked a question in which I unwittingly used the wrong notation to express a certain logical property. I used the notation

$$P \vdash Q$$ when, what I meant to use was:

$$\vdash P \implies \vdash Q$$

The difference between these two expressions is subtle, but my mistake completely changed the meaning of the question I was trying to ask.

The problem is, before I had realized my embarrassing mistake (with the help of a commenter), three answers to the wrong question had already been posted. I edited my question to reflect what I really meant, but now the answers (which have been upvoted several times) do not actually correspond to the question. I left comments on the answers apologizing for my mistake, but so far none of the answers have been edited to reflect the actual question I was asking (and I haven't upvoted or downvoted any of them yet).

At this point, should I:

  1. Wait for a new answer and/or edits that respond to my actual question and then accept the appropriate answer, or
  2. Roll back my edits to the question so that the existing answers correspond to the question again, and then ask a new question with my edits implemented (as the top-upvoted answerer suggested), or
  3. Leave more comments on the answers, encouraging them to edit their answers (which might be problematic as the revised question is probably harder to answer than the original question), or
  4. Some other solution, or some combination of the above solutions?
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    $\begingroup$ Option 2 is the correct one. $\endgroup$ – quid Sep 7 '17 at 22:56
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    $\begingroup$ @quid Ok, thanks for the advice! I reverted the question to the original notation, and created a new question here with the correct notation. $\endgroup$ – Hans Brende Sep 7 '17 at 23:58
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    $\begingroup$ You can also go the "Bender route of embarrassment", with his famous quote "I am so embarrassed. I wish everyone else was dead." $\endgroup$ – Asaf Karagila Sep 8 '17 at 12:01

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