4
$\begingroup$

I want to graph a 2d surface in 3d Euclidean space and then plot multiple trajectories along the surface. Is it okay to ask what free graphing/plotting tool might be suitable on the main site and how to go about it?

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Definitely before posting such question, you should check whether it wasn't asked before. (This can help you to assess whether such questions have been received well in the past. And if those questions do not satisfy you, you should probably explain how it is different - so that it is not closed as a duplicate.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Oct 3 '17 at 7:57
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ The post Graphing Software - a faq? has some links to similar questions on main. And if you search a bit, you can certainly find many more similar questions. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Oct 3 '17 at 8:01
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ You can find several such posts here on meta, for example, Creating diagrams and other posts linked there. Another one is Creating simple graphs. $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Oct 3 '17 at 8:04
2
$\begingroup$

If the graphing task were closely connected to a specific mathematical problem, as opposed to a generic need to "plot multiple trajectories" on a surface, then your question might be suitable for the main Math.SE site. It is the nexus of using mathematical software for a specific (mathematical) problem that would make it on-topic there.

As the selection of Martin Sleziak's links to past Questions shows, there has been general discussion of the image creation process and tools here on Meta-Math.SE. In part this can be rationalized by referring to the Meta-Math.SE FAQ which mentions "how the software itself works" as suitable for community discussion here. While the software referred to is the system software that StackExchange provides, it is natural to concern ourselves with how best to create images that "work" within the StackExchange environment (including issues of hosting, formatting, editing, etc.).

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .