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After putting a bounty on an old question, I attempted to edit the tags of the question to remove the tag and add the tags , , and . This change was accepted by one user and rejected by another resulting in the entire edit to be rejected. (This can be seen in the review history).

But the reason for rejection is unclear to me. Linear algebra seems unrelated to the question, and the other tags seem both more appropriate to the subject matter and necessary to get the visibility that the question needs.

Am I wrong in thinking editing the tags is justified? If so, why?

If not, then is the best course of action to attempt the edit again, citing this question in the edit reason?

Edit I found an answer that may relate to this question. The tag might have been considered too broad. However, the description for the tag says

Abstract algebra is the study of algebraic objects. Some of the more common algebraic objects are groups, rings, fields, vector spaces, modules, among other topics. Whenever you use this tag, please also include related tags like group-theory, ring-theory, modules, etc., in order to make more clear about which topic of abstract algebra is your question and also to help other users to find similar questions through the search engine.

I would assume that the , , and would count as "includ[ing] related tags".

Edit 2 Looks like someone added the tags themselves. Thanks!

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Approvals and rejections for an edit are an independent judgement.

The approval from the first reviewer shows that you've added appropriate tags to the question.

However, the second reviewer disapproves of your edit because he/she thoughts you could have done better by fixing the formatting and grammar of the question, as can be seen by his/her edit.

In this case, that edit doesn't address the issue of wrong tags, so you may submit the tag edit again with a short reason "corrected tags" and wait for the approval from another two reviewers.

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