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So I recently asked this question. After reading the responses, and a day's worth of rabbit-holing, I've realized that I asked the wrong question (I also made the mistake of using the letter $\omega$ for hyperreal infinities and using the word 'transfinite').

The answer helped me realize this, and pinpoint what I meant ask, but now I have a problem. I see why the answer makes sense, and it's a good answer, but I also see why the question doesn't.

If I edit the question to clarify what I intended to ask, then I'd be asking a different question. If I reword the question to line up with how it was interpereted, then it seems trivial. I can't delete the question, because the answer is correct. What should I do?

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    $\begingroup$ You gratefully accept the answer, and post a new separate question, where in particular you indicate the key differences with the other version. $\endgroup$ – Andrés E. Caicedo Feb 6 at 17:19
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    $\begingroup$ Possibly also add a link to the new question in the old one? This could be helpful in directing people to the right one and in alerting them to the fact that it isn't a duplicate. $\endgroup$ – timtfj Feb 7 at 1:55
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    $\begingroup$ In the context of the linked Question you posted, there is still a good bit of nonsense in the problem statement. The Answer you received is not perhaps the one you wanted, but it contains some basic ideas to guide you in thinking about the sequence of power sets in your Question and about transfinite induction generally. You connect your problem with Abraham Robinson and non-standard analysis, but it isn't clear what you were trying ask or assert about "resolving" Russell's paradox. This seems to be the reason for the close votes. $\endgroup$ – hardmath Feb 7 at 16:28
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You just accept the answer and make a new post of your actual question to be asked

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