14
$\begingroup$

I recently created a new tag: .

Other than English, the main languages in which mathematics is published are French, German and Russian. We have a tag already. Thus, why not have a tag for German, too? One could post questions on the German Language SE, but there are Germans on Mathematics SE who can arguably provide more accurate translations.

If I read a translation of a mathematical term in German Language SE, how can I trust the answer? In Mathematics SE, I can click on someone's profile. If this someone has a lot of points in, say, real analysis, then I can trust that someone's translation of a German term used in real analysis. Especially if that someone has a German name.

Constructive criticism is most welcome. Thank you for your attention.

$\endgroup$
  • 8
    $\begingroup$ Note that on German Language SE, we have a lot of mathematicians and a tag for mathematics. $\endgroup$ – Wrzlprmft Mar 9 at 10:05
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @Wrzlprmft Does the German Language SE also allow $\LaTeX$? $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo de Azevedo Mar 9 at 10:06
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ No, but then I think most of those questions don’t use it and those who do don’t really rely on it. $\endgroup$ – Wrzlprmft Mar 9 at 10:09
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ @Wrzlprmft More importantly, if I read a translation of a mathematical term in German Language SE, how can I trust the answer? In Math SE, I can click on someone's profile. If this someone has a lot of points in, say, real analysis, then I can trust that someone's translation of a German term used in real analysis. Especially if that someone has a German name. $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo de Azevedo Mar 9 at 10:16
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ You can add these points to your question $\endgroup$ – Ooker Mar 9 at 11:41
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ @RodrigodeAzevedo: Well, how can you rely that somebody has sufficient expertise in mathematical German? Moreover, unless hidden, you can use the network profile, to gauge expertise in all relevant areas. Finally, good answers to this sort of question can often stand by themselves and do not rely on the reputation of the answerer. — Anyway, please note that I am not arguing against this tag per se. It’s just not that we have no idea what we are doing over on German Language. $\endgroup$ – Wrzlprmft Mar 9 at 11:47
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @Wrzlprmft That is quite true. However, if someone's profile has a link to a webpage at a German / Austrian / Swiss mathematics department, then I can put considerable trust in that someone's translations. $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo de Azevedo Mar 9 at 11:52
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I have no objection to the creation of a mathematical-German tag, but as to whether it's needed, I don't see why one can't ask a question about mathematical German without having such a tag. $\endgroup$ – Gerry Myerson Mar 9 at 22:48
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ @GerryMyerson One can certainly ask such a question without a tag, but will the people competent to answer it actually find it? Tags allow subscription, after all. $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo de Azevedo Mar 9 at 22:59
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ @RodrigodeAzevedo: From an experience gained after asking in a German Language Forum about the (non-math) meaning of "Aus dem Spiegel-Spiel des Gerings des Ringes ereignet sich das Dingen des Dinges" I would strongly support your new tag. $\endgroup$ – Maksim Mar 10 at 8:54
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ Are there needs not covered by having the tag translation-request? This reservation applies to German and French alike. $\endgroup$ – Jyrki Lahtonen Mar 10 at 21:46
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I don't think the volume of traffic would be too high. I subscribe to a few tags also, but am considering giving up that particular service. After all, I visit the site almost every day anyway, and I get the contents of the "feed" faster by checking out my favorite tags. Whatever, I see your point. I am 100% behind giving German and French equal treatment here. Either both tags are ok, or neither is. $\endgroup$ – Jyrki Lahtonen Mar 11 at 6:24
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I think there is a historical difference between languages here. Research maths written in German is from before world war II (ie before 1940). Research maths written in Russion was common until the fall of the Sowjet Union (so before 1990). French is still used (rarely) for research papers. So questions on mathematical German are almost always mathematical history questions. In French or Russian this need not be the case. $\endgroup$ – quarague Mar 11 at 8:02
  • 12
    $\begingroup$ @quarague German is still the primary language of instruction in mathematics departments at most German universities, which could prompt questions from foreign students studying in Germany, such as myself. And many graduate-level textbooks are (first) published in German, e.g. Neukirch's Algebraic Number Theory. Just because research papers are now published in English, doesn't mean that mathematical history is the only domain in which such questions arise. $\endgroup$ – zxmkn Mar 11 at 18:13
  • 5
    $\begingroup$ Can I use this tag to ask questions in German? $\endgroup$ – New2Math Mar 12 at 16:59

You must log in to answer this question.

Browse other questions tagged .