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I'm a 10th grader so my maths is nowhere near as complex as some of you reading right now. So how do I ask for easy solutions when that is subjective (dependent on the person). Should i explain my level of understanding.

Your input will really increase my ability to use this website

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    $\begingroup$ Can you give an example? $\endgroup$ – Asaf Karagila Jul 25 at 6:20
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    $\begingroup$ If you're a tenth grader then this answer of yours is quite impressive $\endgroup$ – TheSimpliFire Jul 25 at 6:26
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    $\begingroup$ "Should i explain my level of understanding." Sounds like the right idea to me. $\endgroup$ – Gerry Myerson Jul 25 at 12:48
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    $\begingroup$ @TheSimpliFire thank you, i was reading the AOPS Vol. 2 and the problem seemed right for that type of substitution :) $\endgroup$ – user610551 Jul 25 at 15:07
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    $\begingroup$ @AsafKaragila if I was to ask, for example, a question about trig, (I'm not familiar with $ln$ and $log$ properties and a lot more things) but some of the most elegant, beautiful solutions involve complex math i don't even know yet. $\endgroup$ – user610551 Jul 25 at 15:14
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    $\begingroup$ @GerryMyerson for me personally that's a really hard thing to do since I avoid some topics and go about math in an unorthodox order. For example, I fail at vectors but I can do some limits. Thanks for your answer $\endgroup$ – user610551 Jul 25 at 15:16
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    $\begingroup$ You ask for a "easy" solutions. I counter with the following paraphrased maxim (colloquially referred to as the "Law of Conservation of Difficulty", and (I think (nested parentheses!)) often attributed to Terrance Tao): Every problem has some difficulties which cannot be made to disappear. An elementary answer might actually be quite complicated because one is not using powerful tools. On the other hand, if you are using powerful tools, then somewhere along the line, someone had to develop those tools. In either case, you can't get around the fundamental difficulty of a problem. $\endgroup$ – Xander Henderson Jul 25 at 16:28
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See How to Ask a Good Question. In particular, the first bullet-point:

Provide context, include the source and motivation for your question, and avoid "no-clue" questions.

I think if you do that, then we will know what your level is, and be able to answer accordingly.

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