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Hi: I was defining a set with curly braces and put some words in between. For instance: {f: for all x, f < x}. If I enclose all between dollar signs (ds) the text will be poorly legible. Let's leave the ds's and place one immediately preceding the text and another immediately following. Then I get "unbalanced braces". I just don't know how to use mathjax to write an expression as in the example above. Unless latex has a way to include text within ds's. Can you help me? Anyways, why has mathjax to complain about an unbalanced brace? Can't he leave it as is?

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  • $\begingroup$ Try using \text{}. $\endgroup$ – Michael Albanese Mar 20 at 20:16
  • $\begingroup$ Your "unbalanced braces" are probably due to having put only one in each of the two MathJax expressions. The curly brace is a signifier of scope in $\LaTeX$, so you get an error when they are unmatched. To get the literal curly brace character within a MathJax expression, you will need to "escape" them, \{ and \}. See the MathJax Basic Tutorial and Quick Reference, Item 6 on Parentheses. $\endgroup$ – hardmath Mar 21 at 13:42
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As hinted at in a comment you can write

$\{f: \text{ for all } x, f < x\}$

$\{f: \text{ for all } x, f < x\}$

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    $\begingroup$ Else: $\{f: \forall x, f< x\}$ which renders $\{ f: \forall x, f< x\}$ $\endgroup$ – amWhy Mar 20 at 20:40
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, that it is a neat workaround for not being able to write text, avoid text. $\endgroup$ – quid Mar 20 at 20:42
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    $\begingroup$ Also stf91, pay close attention to quid's formatting: For any brace (curly bracket) to render in mathjax, you need immediately precede them with a backslash, with no space in between the backslash and the curly bracket. ${x}$ renders as: ${x}$, but $\{ x \}$ renders as $\{x\}$. $\endgroup$ – amWhy Mar 21 at 10:07
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    $\begingroup$ Similarly, to format $\$$ or $\%$ in mathjax, one needs to precede those symbols with a backslash. So if you want to format say "After a discount of $40\%$, an item originally priced at $\$50$ will only cost you $\$30$." You'd format including $40\%$, $\$50$, and $\$30$. $\endgroup$ – amWhy Mar 21 at 10:13

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