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Several posts both on the main site and on meta mention uniquation as a tool for searching online for websites containing some mathematical formula.1

The URL for this website provided in those answers is: http://uniquation.com/ If you try it, you can see that the link no longer works (you only get the information that this domain is for sale)

Question 1: Does somebody know whether this search engine no longer exists, or it was just moved to another domain?

Question 2: Is the source code available somewhere - so that somebody could try to run the same engine on their own hosting (at least in theory)?

Question 3: Does somebody has enough experience with uniquation (back when it used to work) to be able to say how the results compare to some other similar search engines? (For example, the ones mentioned here: How to search the internet for strings that consist mostly of math notation?)


1There are also some comments on main and on meta which mention this site. Searching in the post with this link in the whole network, I found also this post on MathOverflow Meta: Is there any third party search engine for MathOverflow? And this post on TeX Stack Exchange: What useful web services are out there?

2You can see how this website looked in the Wayback Machine. In fact, it seems that the snapshots of the search results for some searches were saved too - after I clicked on the first link in that snapshot, I got search results for $\sin(\alpha+\beta)$

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    $\begingroup$ I currently use approach0.xyz which I find very efficient $\endgroup$ – Jean Marie Apr 24 at 7:56
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    $\begingroup$ This is not a question about mathematics; shouldn’t it be on the meta site, if it is about searching? $\endgroup$ – Arturo Magidin Apr 25 at 4:22
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    $\begingroup$ @ArturoMagidin Well, there were certainly similar questions asked in the past, for example, some questions about searching for math symbols, some questions about website which no longer exist. If it is posted somewhere, probably main is more suitable than meta - since it is not specifically about searching this site. (But if the question is closed, I will certainly respect the community decision on this.) $\endgroup$ – Martin Sleziak Apr 25 at 4:42
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    $\begingroup$ You are asking about search engines, not about mathematics. The connection to mathematics is strained, at best, and only by mention. $\endgroup$ – Arturo Magidin Apr 25 at 4:49
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    $\begingroup$ Your first link leads to four questions. Two are about mathematics and mathematical notation; one is this. At best, only the first question would be applicable. $\endgroup$ – Arturo Magidin Apr 25 at 4:51
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    $\begingroup$ According to the author of uniquation (see his Twitter account @rystsov), "Project is frozen", and as far as I recall, it is not open sourced. $\endgroup$ – Wei Zhong Apr 27 at 10:54

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