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I am planning to create manual solutions for some famous books in Analysis, Topology, Algebra which currently do not have available online solutions. I'd like to share those solutions on this site in order to get comments from readers in case some of my solutions might be wrong or there is another better idea to solve. Is there any way to do that in math stack exchange in a way that everyone can easily search, access solutions? For example, can I create a list of questions whose title is something like "Solutions for chapter x, book y"? In that way, one just needs to access that list to see all questions and solutions for a particular chapter in a particular book. Of course, one is able to comment, discuss each solution in that list freely as usual.

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    $\begingroup$ Something similar was done recently $\endgroup$ Jun 28 at 7:04
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    $\begingroup$ To add to the 7 years old answers in the above link: most of the exercises of famous textbooks has been asked and answered on MSE, multiple times. Please think twice (or, search twice) before posting any such questions and make sure you are not adding more noise to it. $\endgroup$ Jun 28 at 7:30
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Instead I would recommend title the question, and show what you have done or where you are stuck. Titles with book names and question with no attempt is not fairly welcomed in this community.

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    $\begingroup$ I know! the point is I have done all of the questions, and I'd like to share them publicly on this site to get comments or better ideas. Of course, I won't post those questions with no solutions or attempts on that list. $\endgroup$ Jun 28 at 5:30
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not sure that this format would be welcome on the site. This isn't a homework solution site. Questions on the forum need to have attempt as part of the question, you can't just ask "how do I do X problem?" But that's the format of the solution sets you're suggesting, even if you answer your own question $\endgroup$
    – MathTrain
    Jun 28 at 5:36
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    $\begingroup$ @HoangNguyen yea, you can show your own soln, and ask for any different approach $\endgroup$ Jun 28 at 5:43

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