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It seems that the tag is almost never used on Meta sites; for example, Meta.SE or Physics Meta does not have such a tag. In my opinion, this tag should be removed because of the following reasons:

  • According to this guideline, meta is a place to talk about how this community should work, rather than how a specific user should work. If any user has any problem with a specific user, the best and only way for them, I think, is to talk to a moderator in a chat room or flagging a related post, rather than addressing that user in a public post.

  • Existence of this tag among others is somewhat misleading. Any user, especially novice Meta contributors, may conclude that they can easily address any user in their Meta posts.

  • According to this guideline, tags should be used to help people to browse posts related to the subject of their concerns. I think this tag does not help anyone in this matter.

  • The Stack Exchange community team explicitly stated that we always kill off the tag every time it appears. I think, removing the tag by Math.SE users themselves is better than that the community team kill it off by force.

So, my question is,

is it not better to remove this tag?

I hope this post is the last Meta post tagged .

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    $\begingroup$ The claim that this is the only meta with this tag is not correct. The tag with such name exists on Stack Overflow Meta and MathOverflow meta. There is also a tag called specific-user-account on Theoretical Computer Science Meta. (At the moment I did not find a way to find occurrences of a tag over all sites, but I guess there won't be too many other sites with this tag.) $\endgroup$ Jul 27 at 8:14
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    $\begingroup$ This SEDE query seems to confirm that there are three meta sites with this tag. $\endgroup$ Jul 27 at 8:24
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    $\begingroup$ I don't think the tag should be removed. For example, the most recent question which uses it, which is this one, uses it well and appropriately. Another good example is here. The fact that a question is asking about the actions of a specific user does not mean that identifiable details need to be shared, nor that the question is not applicable to later readers. $\endgroup$
    – user1729
    Jul 27 at 10:14
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    $\begingroup$ (Some of the questions using the tag do share identifiable details, but the fact that they used the tag means any janitorial work there can be easily carried out...) $\endgroup$
    – user1729
    Jul 27 at 10:19
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    $\begingroup$ The current post is not an exact duplicate of the one that was closed & deleted by a moderator. Some months after it was closed & deleted, you edited out a large part of that post. The current post is only a duplicate of the part of the older post that remained after your edit. $\endgroup$ Jul 27 at 13:08
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    $\begingroup$ I deleted the preamble as it was a needless distraction. $\endgroup$
    – user1729
    Jul 27 at 13:25
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    $\begingroup$ @user, agreed, it was a distraction, but it did alert us that OP has already brought up the matter of the specific-user tag. $\endgroup$ Jul 27 at 23:08
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I don't think the tag should be removed. It is useful for questions asking about the actions of a specific user, and how the community (and not "specific users") should or can respond. Such questions do not require identifiable detail to be shared (which is the issue addressed in your link "we always kill off the tag every time it appears"). For example, the most recent question which uses it, which is this one, uses it well and appropriately. Another good example is here.

If someone has a problem with a specific user then browsing this tag may be a useful first step. Resolving the situation by considering past, similar situations and acting on the advice given there (often by moderators) is preferable to getting the moderators involved every time. For example, the second question I linked above did not required moderator intervention, while the first is more nuanced and reading that question before acting would be helpful to someone in that situation.

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