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I think that the following six accounts (all of them unregistered) belong to the same user: one, two, three, four, five, six. I base this judgement on the similarity of the usernames and gravatars, as well as the similar writing styles.

In this question (now deleted), I had left a comment requesting the user to confirm that all the accounts belong to them, and asking them not to create a different account for each new post. My comment got multiple upvotes, but no response from the OP; I do not know what more to do.

Can the moderators do something about this? Can the user be contacted and asked to stop this behavior?

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    $\begingroup$ The gravatars in 1 and 4 are different then the rest. $\endgroup$ – Eric Naslund Jan 9 '12 at 6:03
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    $\begingroup$ @Srivatsan: in general, flag for moderator attention one of the posts would be a good start. $\endgroup$ – Willie Wong Jan 9 '12 at 9:04
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    $\begingroup$ I have merged no. 2, 3, 5, 6 into one account. No. 4 is almost surely the same person. I have some slight doubts about No. 1. $\endgroup$ – Willie Wong Jan 9 '12 at 9:23
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    $\begingroup$ @Willie: Thank you for merging the accounts. Thanks also for the comment about moderator attention. Under usual circumstances that is what I would do. (In the past, I have successfully flagged the moderators a few times, requesting merger of accounts.) But in this case, it seemed to me that the user is a repeat-offender, and is intentionally creating separate accounts for each new post. That's why I posted it here; apologies if I should not have done this. $\endgroup$ – Srivatsan Jan 9 '12 at 17:28
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    $\begingroup$ @Srivatsan: as a general guideline, we try to avoid "naming names" in meta. That is, discussions at meta should, ideally, be about "general practices". Concerns about individuals or individual posts should generally be (first) handled through flags/e-mails. Of course, certain times circumstances calls for a discussion among the community; it is really up to you the user to decide whether the issue is that something the moderators can directly resolve or something that the community as a whole should be brought in. $\endgroup$ – Willie Wong Jan 10 '12 at 8:44
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    $\begingroup$ To put a (slightly contrived and imperfect) real-life counterpart: the difference is between asking your neighbour to turn down the music (leaving a comment), asking the super at your apartment to do something about it (mod flag/e-mail), or posting a flyer at the community bulletin requesting for comments on whether that neighbour is playing his music too loudly (posting on meta). $\endgroup$ – Willie Wong Jan 10 '12 at 8:47
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FWIW, there are many users on this site with 3 or more accounts tied to the same e-mail address. (The Data.SX browser searches these dupes using e-mail hashes, so the e-mails are not revealed.) When I first started as a moderator I wanted to do something about this. But for the most part these users are not particularly more likely to cause trouble (compared to the general user base). So usually I've been just merging accounts when users cannot edit or comment upon their own questions, or when there's a clear case of abuse.

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