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When I want to write limits with single dollar signs the index ($x\to n$) goes after the $\lim$ sign:

$L=\lim_{x\to 0}f(x)$

But when using double dollar signs the index (correctly) goes below the limit sign:

$$L=\lim_{x\to 0}f(x)$$

What's the reason for this difference? How to write the index below limit sign with single dollar signs?

Is this problem only seen in limits?

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    $\begingroup$ In mathematical typography both versions that you're seeing are correct in place. Inline formulae (those produced by the single dollar sign enclosures) do not have as much space as display-style (double dollar sign, on a line of their own) formulae so the limits are conventionally displayed differently. $\endgroup$
    – postmortes
    Oct 15, 2023 at 8:18
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    $\begingroup$ If you really want that use \lim\limits_{x\to a} . However it is best to avoid it in typical inline usage. $\endgroup$
    – Paramanand Singh Mod
    Oct 15, 2023 at 9:03
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    $\begingroup$ Or, you could use \displaystyle\limit_{x\to a} inside single dollar signs – but I agree with those who advise against it. $\endgroup$ Oct 15, 2023 at 11:49
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    $\begingroup$ This adjustment occurs whenever the bottom parameter could be placed either on the side or right below the operation. For example, consider $\sup_{x \in A}f(x)$ and $$ \sup_{x \in A} f(x).$$ The problem is not confined only to limits. $\endgroup$ Oct 15, 2023 at 14:03

1 Answer 1

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Here is some text written down to show what happens when we do this.
Here is some text written down to show what happens when we do this.
What they said in the comments. Writing $L=\lim_\limits{x\to 0}f(x)$ as in-line text disrupts the line spacing.
Here is some text written down to show what happens when we do this.
Here is some text written down to show what happens when we do this.

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  • $\begingroup$ The first sentence of your answer is frequently repeated. $\endgroup$
    – user724085
    Oct 15, 2023 at 13:39
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    $\begingroup$ Pretty sure that's intentional, to illustrate the flow that the typesetting in question disrupts. $\endgroup$
    – JonathanZ
    Oct 15, 2023 at 14:22

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