7
$\begingroup$

So initially I asked a not so well-focused and clear question on expressing functions as sums of exponential and sinusoidal functions.

Then later I deleted it because it wasn’t so clear.

Then, just now, I got an idea to improve the question, but also changed it a bit. Hence I undeleted that question and edited it.

Would it have been better if I asked a new question, or undeleting and editing it?

$\endgroup$
4
  • 2
    $\begingroup$ It would be helpful to link the question you are referring to $\endgroup$ Mar 10 at 19:39
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ Did the question attract any comments or answers before you deleted it? $\endgroup$ Mar 10 at 19:53
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @NotMath You probably mean this question $\endgroup$ Mar 10 at 22:24
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ @ТymaGaidash that’s the right one $\endgroup$
    – NotMath
    Mar 11 at 6:24

1 Answer 1

8
$\begingroup$

There's no best approach for all self-deleted Questions. Here are a few arguments for undeleting and revising.

The undeletion allows you to continue getting the Community's feedback on what may be unclear or misstated. Looking at your particular post, I'm not sure you've improved it as much as you hoped. I assume you really have an interest in getting helpful responses there, so as an opening move, undeleting makes sense.

Also it is better for your standing to have just one failed Question rather than a string of separate failed Questions. So that also argues for undeletion.

This puts importance on getting the Question right this time. In my opinion it still suffers from asking about more than one thing. Although the parts of your Question are likely closely related, and thus allowable, you don't concretely sketch out the connections among them.

If it were my "second attempt" to ask, I'd put emphasis on the first thing that I could not convincingly answer for myself. This would hope to get unstuck (given a cleared roadblock) to be able to proceed to the next obstacle, using a follow-up Question that links back to the resolved earlier post.

I would encourage you to check out some of the chatrooms that help users with revising and clarifying Questions. Many times having to explain the problem to others gets our thoughts sharpened, perhaps to even being to answer our own Question. Good luck with finding what you are looking for.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .