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I asked a question earlier using a piece of terminology that was clear in context. A reputable user answered as if the question had been about a more familiar use of the word in an unrelated area. As it stands, the answer is misleading.

What is the preferred course of action?

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    $\begingroup$ Inform the user of the misunderstanding in a comment and, perhaps, edit the post to clarify the ambiguity. $\endgroup$
    – lulu
    Mar 27 at 23:16
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    $\begingroup$ The confusion comes from your word "realization" which has no fixed meaning in geometry and is used by different authors differently. You wrote a long post but you never defined what you mean when you use this word. $\endgroup$ Mar 28 at 0:02
  • $\begingroup$ Note: the relevant question appears to be this one. $\endgroup$
    – lulu
    Mar 28 at 0:04
  • $\begingroup$ @MoisheKohan The confusion was due to the word "helix", which I defined at the start of the post. $\endgroup$
    – Numeral
    Mar 28 at 0:05
  • $\begingroup$ I did inform the user of the misunderstanding. Their answer uses a picture of a standard helix, not the polygonal helix relevant to the question. $\endgroup$
    – Numeral
    Mar 28 at 0:08
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    $\begingroup$ There are several questions in your post, which is never a good idea. The question I was referring to is "Can it really be that the same abstract regular polytope can have such qualitatively different realisations?" This is the question that Ethan was answering. All in all, the onus is on you to make your question clear and in the current form it is not. (For the record, I published several papers on rigidity and flexibility of polygonal graphs in Euclidean space and my reading of your question is the same as Ethan's.) $\endgroup$ Mar 28 at 0:18
  • $\begingroup$ This post isn't about Ethan's interpretation, but thank you for your response and advice. $\endgroup$
    – Numeral
    Mar 28 at 0:49

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