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Question:

Are questions regarding Geogebra allowed here, or should they be asked on SO?

I have a problem currently with trying to plot a certain function $f(x,y)$ in Geogebra which contains both real and imaginary parts, which Geogebra can handle to the best of my knowledge.

In this case, my question is about how I should go about (or what I am doing wrong when) plotting this specific function.

Seeing that there currently no tag currently, I would like to know if questions regarding Geogebra would be considered allowed here, or if I should post on SO instead (where there exists a [geogebra] tag).

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    $\begingroup$ If it is a math question, ask here. Is it is an implementation question, do not ask here. $\endgroup$
    – Xander Henderson Mod
    Apr 9 at 20:44
  • $\begingroup$ @XanderHenderson Sorry if I am missing something, but wouldn't having trouble plotting a function fall under implementation? $\endgroup$
    – CrSb0001
    Apr 9 at 20:56
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    $\begingroup$ Yes, it very likely would fall under the general umbrella of "implementation". Which would make it off-topic here. (Which is not to say that it would be on-topic on SO, but such a question is not on-topic here.) $\endgroup$
    – Xander Henderson Mod
    Apr 9 at 21:07
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    $\begingroup$ I'm not a Geogebra user, but I'd first try posing a "how do I do this" type query at the Geogebra help center. $\endgroup$
    – hardmath
    Apr 10 at 2:53
  • $\begingroup$ There is an older question: Can I ask Geogebra questions on this site? It has no answers at the moment, but one of the comments links to this question: Do we actually "welcome questions about: • Software that mathematicians use"? $\endgroup$ Apr 12 at 7:15
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    $\begingroup$ Are you aware that Geogebra has the functions re() (for the real) and im() (for the imaginary part) of complex numbers? $\endgroup$
    – Dominique
    Apr 12 at 12:59
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    $\begingroup$ @Dominique Thank you, that seems to be what I was missing. Despite Geogebra lagging "a bit" when trying to render the equation/trying to adjust the axis, it is still very helpful :) $\endgroup$
    – CrSb0001
    Apr 12 at 16:45
  • $\begingroup$ Also sorry for not mentioning that I had posted a question on Meta.SE a bit after I posted this, I was just trying to see if I could get any answers on there (to then post here) since the [site-recommendation] tag exists. $\endgroup$
    – CrSb0001
    Apr 24 at 15:13
  • $\begingroup$ Excuse me but what exactly is geogebra? $\endgroup$ Apr 24 at 18:21
  • $\begingroup$ @YourLordJoyBoy It's a math software that some mathematicians use, although it's usually used on higher-end computers (not like the Chromebook) due to it being extremely laggy on low end devices when trying to adjust the graph or input functions. $\endgroup$
    – CrSb0001
    Apr 24 at 18:23
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    $\begingroup$ So it's software? But its not too reliable for the most part? If I'm wrong on that I apologize, this is the first I've heard of it. $\endgroup$ Apr 24 at 18:26

1 Answer 1

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Answer to my question about this on Meta.SE for reference

From the comments here:

[4] If it is a math question, ask here. I[f] it is an implementation question, do not ask here. -Xander Henderson [Mod] Apr 9 at 20:56

[5] Yes, it very likely would fall under the general umbrella of "implementation". Which would make it off-topic here. (Which is not to say that it would be on-topic on SO, but such a question is not on-topic here.) -Xander Henderson [Mod] Apr 9 at 21:07


So in general:

  • This type of question should be asked on SO if it is a specific implementation question (i.e. a programming problem with Geogebra)
  • As @hardmath noted and as noted in an earlier Math.SE Meta post (linked by @MartinSleziak), I could also post a query like "how do I plot ___" in the Geogebra help center.

Overall:

  • If it is a math problem, ask on Math.SE.
  • If it is a specific implementation problem that is giving me trouble, ask on SO.
  • If it is a "how do I plot ___" question, post it in the Geogebra help center.
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