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In response to this thread, I am starting a thread to compile other online mathematics-related sites to give people places to look before asking a question. These should be included in the FAQ like they are on MathOverflow.

Please one resource per answer. Give them in the following format:

Name

Link


Description

# Name #
## [Link](fakewebsitethatdoesntexist.com) ##

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Description
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  • $\begingroup$ I presume down votes are important here, whereas up votes may turn out to simply reflect an individual's taste above anything else. $\endgroup$ – Tom Stephens Aug 1 '10 at 17:36
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    $\begingroup$ @Tom: really? I am voting up the sites that I think will be useful to the average user. For example, although I am quite fond of the nLab, I don't think it's worth putting in the FAQ; the level is just wrong. Besides, anyone who has a question whose answer can be found on the nLab probably already knows it exists. $\endgroup$ – Qiaochu Yuan Aug 2 '10 at 6:58
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    $\begingroup$ real estate is free on a webpage - if we can think of it I think it should appear - unless it is not a reputable source. That's just my two pence. $\endgroup$ – Tom Stephens Aug 2 '10 at 11:23
  • $\begingroup$ Tom, it would be inviting spam to the nlab. If MathOverflow is mentioned in the math.SE FAQ, and users look for analogous lists of sites on MO, they can then find nlab, the K-theory archive, or whatever else. $\endgroup$ – T.. Aug 11 '10 at 6:06

11 Answers 11

27
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The Online Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences (OEIS)

http://oeis.org/


An online database of integer sequences, created and maintained by N. J. A. Sloane.

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  • 1
    $\begingroup$ If you use either Firefox or Chrome, it is pretty easy to set up a bookmark or search engine, respectively, that lets you search the OEIS pretty quickly. I do this whenever I come across a sequence I think is probably known. $\endgroup$ – Qiaochu Yuan Aug 2 '10 at 6:47
20
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MathOverflow

https://mathoverflow.net


A StackExchange site for mathematics at the graduate level and above.

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19
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Wikipedia

https://en.wikipedia.org


Not an entirely frivolous answer: although Wikipedia is a general-purpose encyclopedia, its coverage of several math-related topics has become pretty good, and often these days it can even beat MathWorld at its own feature of being a collection of interesting facts and formulas.

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18
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MathWorld

http://mathworld.wolfram.com/


Math-specific encyclopedia.

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9
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MathOnline

http://mathonline.andreaferretti.it/


A user-submitted database of lecture notes and free books at all levels.

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  • $\begingroup$ The link doesnt work. $\endgroup$ – Shahab Oct 8 '12 at 12:02
7
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Math Pages

http://www.mathpages.com/


A compendium of articles and resources covering several areas of mathematics.

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  • $\begingroup$ Again, why the downvotes? This one-man effort has many fantastic articles, and in plain text too. $\endgroup$ – ShreevatsaR Nov 21 '10 at 18:47
6
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nLab

https://ncatlab.org


A mathematics wiki focusing on category theory, higher category theory, and mathematical physics (TQFTs, AQFTs, etc.).

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5
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Uniqation

http://uniquation.com/en/
math.se-specific: http://uniquation.com/mathexchange


Search for formulas and expressions written in TeX. Useful alternative to other search engines that strip out important formatting.

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4
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Physics StackExchange

https://physics.stackexchange.com


Our equivalent for physics, a good place for those questions that are more physics than math.

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3
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Encyclopedia of Triangle Centers

http://faculty.evansville.edu/ck6/encyclopedia/ETC.html


An online database of triangle centers, maintained by Clark Kimberling.

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    $\begingroup$ Why the downvotes? This is a great resource for the topic it covers. $\endgroup$ – ShreevatsaR Oct 27 '10 at 16:30
  • $\begingroup$ I think it's too specific for the FAQ. If we start listing something like this the list will get really really long. (E.g. the knot atlas (katlas.math.toronto.edu/wiki/Main_Page) to take something close to what I'm often thinking about.) $\endgroup$ – Noah Snyder Dec 21 '10 at 7:04
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Theoretic Computer Science

https://cstheory.stackexchange.com/


Our equivalent for theoretical computer science, a good place for those questions that concern TCS.

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  • 3
    $\begingroup$ cstheory is for <i>research level</i> questions. $\endgroup$ – Yuval Filmus Dec 21 '10 at 7:14
  • $\begingroup$ Oops, then probably it doesn't belong on the FAQ. $\endgroup$ – Noah Snyder Dec 21 '10 at 18:35

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