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I arrived at a point of some class notes I'm reading for my dissertation that I can't understand a given demonstration; it's full of morphisms and heavy ring/category theory and I can't get through it. I tried to find the original demonstration (due to Abhyankar) but I couldn't. Should I post it on main as in the text and ask for details or would it be asking too much?

Thanks in advance.

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    $\begingroup$ There is a (solution-verification) tag that started recently and might be useful for this. $\endgroup$ – zyx May 7 '13 at 16:35
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Not knowing exactly what you are wanting to ask, my opinion is that you should post it.

If there is a well defined question, then go for it. But it has to be clear what you are asking. If you have a series of questions, I would break it up into several questions and post them separately (not all at the same time). So you could start with the first place that you don't understand. When that is clear, you could move on to the next place.

If you can somehow provide a link to the complete notes, that might be helpful for some to get an overview of what you are asking. You, of course, want to make it clear from where in the notes your question is coming, and you might want to copy that part into your question. Also, as mentioned below in the comments, the question should be as self-contained as possible.

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    $\begingroup$ To add some emphasis: The notes sound quite comprehensive. If possible, a link to them and a selected excerpt are probably more useful than the whole thing -- if only to not scare people away by the "Big Wall of Text"-syndrome. $\endgroup$ – Lord_Farin May 7 '13 at 14:48
  • $\begingroup$ @Lord_Farin: I agree. I updated the answer. $\endgroup$ – Thomas May 7 '13 at 15:42
  • $\begingroup$ Regarding links: On the other hand, it is prefered to have the question self-contained - links can become dead links over time. $\endgroup$ – Hagen von Eitzen May 8 '13 at 18:36
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    $\begingroup$ I agree with this. The only reason for posting a link to a set of notes, is that it might help the answerer understand the background. $\endgroup$ – Thomas May 8 '13 at 20:50
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The way you describe your problem, it may be that you are simly lacking some feeling and acquanitance with the language and theory used. In that case, starting some basic questions from the early parts of the text may be helpful. Or start with some overview questions ("Why is it helpful to interprete problem X in the language of category theory and ring theory?"). Both approaches allow you to ask more questions later on an as needed basis.

Of course it is still true that both questions require some background from the text in question which you should include. But probably questions arising from the next steps require less as you will have learned how to filter out unnecessary stuff / pin down the problem exactly without worrying about basic e.g. notational aspects.

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