63

The simplest answer is that this deletion was a mistake. There are protocols for deleting users with that much activity on the site, and they weren't followed. As a result, we're doing two things: Restoring the account from backups. Building extra checks into the software to reduce the likelihood of this ever happening again. These take time - and when ...


57

In the comments to Qiaochu's comment, there is a dispute about whether moderators should delete/close questions from ongoing contests rapidly before they can attract answers. For example, Bill Dubuque writes "moderators should not execute unilatateral deletions on such contentious matters..." while Jonas Meyer writes "we would want a moderator to be able to [...


35

Those in favour of giving away IPs of suspected cheaters should imagine that such a policy would allow me to obtain the IP of anybody asking a question here: Simply copy-paste a recent question asked to a throw-away website that looks like an online contest and - as "organizer" of the "contest" - claim that the asker is cheating in this "contest" and demand ...


30

You're not the only one thinking this behaviour should be changed, my own feature request on Meta.SO to change this is the second-most upvoted unresolved feature request at the moment with a score of over 200. As far as I understand from some comments from SE developers, changing this would be pretty complicated technically. Just transferring the votes to ...


23

Although the answer by Shog9 settles the question in the specific case, the site had other deleted users whose contributions may be of value. So I would like to answer I just want to see his posts neatly available in one place. in greater generality, with a data.SE query Get all answers by a deleted user, together with questions. Given a username such ...


23

Done. Some clarifications for everyone else: As Mad Scientist says in the comments, the SE privacy policy does not allow us to release anyone's IP addresses. This is not under our control. I strongly disagree with mixedmath's answer in the linked thread. When it is brought to my attention that a question is from an ongoing contest, my policy is to delete it ...


20

Currently, when a user is deleted for whatever reason, all of his votes are deleted as well. The reputation other users gained from his upvotes is removed upon deletion. If you lost 110 reputation due to this, it means the deleted user had voted e.g. on 11 of your answers, and those votes were retracted upon deletion. Users are deleted for various reasons, ...


16

We're obligated to remove user accounts and personally-identifying information upon request. While we do try to avoid this (if the person is willing to share his reasoning with us, we'll try to mediate disputes or correct problems), often it is too late by the time we're contacted. And yes, two accounts were removed upon their owners' request yesterday. ...


16

As noted in the comments, you can find instructions for deleting your account here: https://math.stackexchange.com/help/user-deletion Note that unlike some sites, we actually do hard-delete your account here - all of your posts are anonymized (they'll be attributed to "usernnnn"), your votes on others' posts nullified, your bio, preferences and such erased. ...


15

It depends. There are two forms of removal: Deletion deletes all posts with a negative vote total. On posts with a non-negative vote total, it denormalizes identity (as in LVK's comment). Destruction deletes all content, but it is only usable on users with less than 500 reputation. This is reserved for spammers, etc.


12

Votes are so arbitrary and capricious that changing them up or down by one makes little difference. Among my answers in the last week is one of which I think was a thin and fairly obvious answer to a poor question (15 votes and rising) and another which was an informed and researched answer to a deeper question (0 votes). I have learnt to live with it.


12

Yes, the account in question has been deleted. (In general, accounts which are greyed out either belong to a now-deleted account, or, in the case of migrated questions, possibly to an account that was never created. When an account is deleted, the display name is reverted to the default user#### form.) Voluntary account deletions can happen in basically two ...


11

You weren't removed. What it means is that a user who had previously up-voted you has been removed. When a user gets removed, all the reputation they have given out is cancelled; from looking at your profile, it seems that someone up-voted one of your questions (giving you 5 points) and then their account was deleted.


11

It appears that another user has been removed, cancelling the upvotes the user has issued, thus negating the reputation they had given you. I too lost reputation today for that reason.


11

This is a "feature" related to deleting user accounts. When an account is deleted, all of the posts, questions and answers, that have a negative net vote count are automatically deleted. In the case of questions, this happens regardless of the vote counts of the answers. Because your answer deserves to be brought back, I just cast a vote to undelete. If ...


11

Yes. I put together the page Answers by deleted Math.SE users which organizers the answers by score, by user and by tags. How it works: Deleted users are listed in the decreasing order of the total score of their posts. Tags are listed alphabetically, with answer counts in parentheses (the tag counts are for all deleted users together). Answers are listed ...


11

As far as I know, we cannot get some data on dates of account deletions from the Stack Exchange Data Explorer (SEDE). Still, for deleted users we can find the date when they posted their last post. (Assuming they made at least one post. The same is true for comments. And also for some other actions - but I took posts and comments, since they are the most ...


10

Users have been removed, for as long as I have been a moderator, exclusively because they wanted to be removed —apart from a few obvious spammers, that is.


10

No, on a per user basis it's not a new record, not even close. See the point-timeline of Brian M. Scott around end of March this year for a recent loss an order of magnitude higher. Yes, for 'large' accounts votes are often preserved. Actually the criterion are the votes cast, not the points of the user, considering both the absolute number as well as the ...


9

When an account is deleted, all negatively scored posts are deleted. However StackExchange employs only "soft deletion" which means that these posts still exist, they are just hidden to users without sufficient privileges. Such posts can be restored (if you can direct moderators or other sufficiently privileged users to their location for undeletion). (...


9

The cancellation was caused by repeated infringing of rules. Cancellation of real users is a very unusual occurrence. Edit for clarity: Except in the case of SPAM accounts and sometimes sockpuppet accounts (used for artificially inflating reputation), moderators don't (at least as far as I am aware on Math.SE) delete user accounts unilaterally. So to ...


9

In general, you can't know which user was removed, and which of your posts the removed user voted on. It is not under all circumstances impossible to find out beyond reasonable doubt, but one needs to make the right guess what to look for and where. Even moderators generally can't find that out. Most user removals that lead to reputation changes don't come ...


8

It means that a user was removed. This removes all posts they own with negative total score, possibly including questions that you answered and received upvotes on. (Also, it's called "reputation" here, not karma.)


8

One problem with keeping the votes of a removed user, is a problem akin to sock-puppetry. If a user returns and starts up a new account, they would be able to vote more than once on a given question, answer, or comment. This could be handled in much the same way as sock-puppetry if, instead of removing an old user, the mods could simply set an "inactive" ...


8

In this case it was requested by the user. There is deletion and there is destruction. Deletion removes a user but does not remove any of their content which has a positive (non-negative?) vote total. Destruction removes a user and all of their content, but can only be done on users with less than 500 reputation. Not very.


8

The help center contains a page with instructions for how to do it. Since you have significant contributions to the site, you contact Stack Exchange and request the deletion of your account. You will be told what further actions you need to perform to ascertain that it's really your intention to have your account deleted, and when those are done, your ...


8

User was removed vs. Voting corrected The message you received means that someone deleted their profile here or had a sockpuppet profile deleted. If you click on the link in your reputation history, it takes you to the explanation in the help center. It's worth remembering, many of these vote removals will have been from users who chose to remove their ...


7

The user who asked this question was QED, who asked to be deleted over a year ago I believe. Deleted users are not linked, of course. As for the edit, I doubt there is a way to have your answer accepted. However once an answer is upvoted, the question will not be bumped automatically anymore.


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