63

I am in favor of letting people express themselves with smileys. :-)


37

Personally, I don't like emoticons or emojis at all. Nevertheless, the policy I'd suggest is to only remove them (if you feel like it) if you are otherwise editing the post. Specifically, I would not recommend editing a post just to remove emojis/emoticons. This seems in line with the "policy" for "thank yous". As far as I can tell, removing emojis/...


26

Like it or not, the following are true: we are not only rational, but also emotional human beings (not understanding this was the single biggest mistake of all European classical philosophy); as such, we have a natural and healthy tendency to infuse all of our interactions with emotions (remember the 1997 BBC documentary about Wiles' proof of Fermat's ...


25

From a purely practical point of view: how you answer an older question might be different than how you answer a new question. Is frowned upon to do so? There's nothing frowned upon. The only answers people frown upon here are when people post complete solutions to homework problems where there is no apparent effort in the question to solve the problem. ...


17

I share the sentiment but disagree with this being classified as a violation of the code of conduct. Marriage equality is absent in most countries of the world and I found only six countries in which gender assignment at birth is not binary (the latter information was from 2013, much can have changed since.) At places where the law enforces ...


14

You say: I am asking because a downvote is a really easy way for me to communicate that something needs improvement,[...] and I understand that an explanation is better, but isn't a downvote better than nothing? This is mostly true, and basically the design-idea. However, it can lead to the following situation. "Alright. There is a problem with my ...


13

For my part I will say the following. I don't really regret making those chat comments. I mean, I am not willing to apologize for them at the moment. But I do concede that I'm not at all proud of making them. The others have analyzed my state of mind while making those comments reasonably accurately. The one addition I will make is that: I didn't want to ...


12

I think this is a problem that we are ill-equipped to deal with, in that our actions (whatever they are) are unlikely to make a significant impact. The primary sources of these problems are professors, textbook authors, and practice problem websites, and while they produce these problems, we are going to get them on our site. I don't think we should ...


11

It is absolutely not the position of the moderators to condone abusive behavior in chat. Chat is less formal than the main site, so there is, in practice, a bit more room for heated discussion there (much like on meta). Still, everything must remain reasonably civil. That being said, I do not agree that these comments are unfair or abusive. The users are ...


9

Everything in the second paragraph of Theoretical Economist's answer is true and important, and I could write a great deal about it from personal experience, including how it has severely affected my mathematical education. On the other hand, were it not for its unfortunate use of the inflammatory phase "liberal extremist nonsense", I would also agree with ...


8

To quote the Code of Conduct (emphasis mine), We commit to enforcing and improving the Code of Conduct. It applies to everyone using Meta Stack Exchange and the Stack Exchange network, including our team, moderators, and anyone posting to Q&A sites or chat rooms. The code of conduct is clearly intended to be enforced in chat rooms. I would agree that,...


7

Let's just stick to common sense and not attempt to find all possible reasons to get offended when it is rather obvious that no offense has been meant. We have had enough of liberal extremist nonsense in this world recently (recall the Tim Hunt story, to mention just one) to drag it to the mathematical sites. The common politeness and respect to "alternative ...


6

The comments on main show that the other answerer does acknowledge your priority. If you wanted this to be more clear, you might have left your first comment on the other answer undeleted. I think a reader that reads the thread will likely understand the history about correctly: other answer incomplete, your answer complete, the other answer fleshed-out. ...


6

I would say that for a minor error (grammar, typo, inconsequential arithmetic error) that suggesting an edit is the recommended course. For an error that is substantial enough that you must rewrite a large part of the answer, I would either leave a comment or another answer, depending on the length of the section to be added. Neither of these actions would ...


5

I can do no better than to quote Pere's answer in the Math Educator's Stack Exchange thread: The issue is not making problems about heterosexual married couples. The issues are: Implicitly making the assumption that all married couples are heterosexual. Making problems about heterosexual marriages but not about other kinds of couples. ...


5

It depends on the precise context, but generally I would say it is alright if and only if: You make a reasonable effort to present your questions according to our guidelines. See How to ask a good question. In particular, explain the context of the question and possibly your own thoughts about it. Do not simply repost the question "as is"; this would be ...


5

Include source / motivation for your question According to recent discussions on this Meta post-Is it a good idea to include source from where a question is taken? , and by the responses of many experienced users we have decided to make it into a good practice to include the source or motivation of a question. For eg. in contest questions, citing the ...


4

While everyone is writing hate stuff against the Smileys, I'm here to defend and make my point! Smileys are made to Enhance the Communication between the people over the internet ;) It makes even a rude comment, polite and promotes healthy communication between the community members. It Dispromotes the weirdo feeling among people that mathematicians are ...


4

I'd been advised about this before, and been told that an appropriate thing to do would be to ask a new question: your question, in your voice with your context (so it won't be closed). Then flag your question for moderation attention, requesting that the other question be merged with yours. This way any good answers to the old question won't be overlooked ...


3

Basically, people get really offended by unexplained downvotes. If you explain a downvote, they tend to still be very offended, but they can at least argue with, harass, and retaliate against whoever downvoted them. They often do this if you explain a problem with their post without downvoting as well. To top it off, people will often feel bad and upvote ...


3

I've thought a fair amount about the issue of the interpretation of downvotes. It's easy to take the stance that it's just meant as an objective rating of usefulness, relevance, or agreement, depending on the community. There's nothing really wrong with this interpretation, but ultimately it probably doesn't track how most people feel about downvotes. For ...


3

Sometimes it is simply the case that you see something the close voters didn't, and were able to understand the OP's meaning more easily. For example, clarity problems can often arise from language barriers, which some find easier to deal with than others. The primary concern here is the possibility of your edit going against the author's intent. There are ...


2

I've had the experience once or twice of writing an answer, only to discover on improving it that it's simply another version of an existing answer. That happened in Given a book with $100$ pages and a $100$ lemmas, prove that there is some lemma written on the same page as its index where there seem to be two basic approaches, and all the answers use one or ...


1

Perhaps we should restrict ourselves to emojis supported by MathJax: $\ddot{\smile}$ and $\ddot{\frown}$.


1

Regarding the fact the term "marriage" has two inequivalent common usages, I am inclined to treat the situation much like how we treat other terms with the same problem: infer meaning from context, clarify when needed, and maybe advise the author that the term is ambiguous.


1

I'm of the same line of thinking as the OP. Personally I try to use "They", "Them", and so on in my answers, and in everyday conversation. I think it's important not to assume roles (I saw a post on MSE about a farmer that repeatedly referred to "him"), and generally it isn't too hard to be gender neutral. HOWEVER, I do think that in historical problems ...


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