47

It means "question" in Indian English, though I'm not sure about all the nuances. From a question on English.SE: This is Indian English. See Vishy's Indian English Dictionary. July 12, 2006Vishy's Indian English Dictionary: doubt doubt. /DOWT/. A question asking for clarification. In standard English and American, the noun ...


47

Vote here! [no downvotes please. Only upvotes count] $$\Huge{\mathrm{No.}}$$


40

Reading French for a native English speaker is not particularly easy if they haven't had any experience in it, but it is much easier than for someone whose native language is Japanese. However, in algebraic geometry, EGA is a very canonical reference. Furthermore, there are many other influential French-speaking algebraic geometers, such as Serre and ...


30

In my opinion the main issue here is not the language. The possibility of asking in other languages than English was discussed before and several older discussions are linked in the comments. I will not repeat here what was said there. What I see as the main problem is that you want to create private community on this site. This would probably mean that ...


22


15

As an alternate suggestion, how about Spanish and French (and possibly other) language tags? That way speakers of those languages can filter for questions in their language, while English speakers can simply filter them out. Everyone wins.


15

Yes. Write your post in your preferred language, and include a disclaimer (preferably in English) that asks for a translation. You can link to this post so that people know this practice is something we encourage.


13

I’ve now been sent a translation, by someone who prefers to remain anonymous, and have added it to the answer. My thanks to the translator.


13

It sounds to me like the usages of these words in English and French are pretty similar. I think it's ungrammatical in English to say "Solve this integral," although it's something I'd expect students to say all the time and not something I'd ever bother correcting. But you certainly can say "Solve the following problem" if the problem consists of ...


12

In Spanish (at least in Mexico), it is perfectly common and fine to preface a question with "Tengo una duda" (literally, "I have a doubt" or "I have one doubt"). It would be entirely common to hear it just as in the example quoted in Fabian's answer. Though it would be just as likely to hear "Tengo una pregunta" ("I have one question" or "I have a question")....


11

I would say yes on the basis that this sort of question is helpful to future readers who are trying to interpret the odd untranslated foreign-language mathematical text. Good answers to these types of questions might help you fill in the blanks for what your foreign-language-speaking friend or Google Translate could not illuminate.


10

Sorry. Those were short questions in Probability and not even trivial boring questions but nice and typical tricky russian contests' questions. A language forum has linguists around not mathematicians. I also was going to compile the problems along with my answers in English and publish them on a forum.


9

I don't know that you have to assume they know a language to list a very important text in the field that is in that language. More information is better. If someone is sufficiently motivated they will learn the language. I wouldn't want to assume someone is not motivated to that extent. Additionally, in the case of English speakers and French, enough ...


9

There have been not dissimilar questions asked in the past, and even a translation-request tag created. As long as you have specific terms you wish translated into Italian, I cannot see there being a problem with such a question.


8

We already have translation-request, which I recall to have been mentioned as a potential tag for this sort of thing. Unfortunately, there is a large majority of people who will probably downvote any question posted in a foreign language (closure is not a problem, a question can be reopened once someone translates it). But there is a foreseeable difficulty ...


8

If a question is in a foreign language and you can't figure out what it says, ask for a translation, but don't vote to close. I have more than once seen extremely rude comments directed at those who don't post in English, but I have never seen a good question or answer which was unreadable because it was in a different language. Why should we enact a rude ...


7

While I think it is a really great idea to be open to a larger audience, I also hope we can minimize a deluge of unreadable questions. At the moment We don't get many of these, so it makes sense to handle them by case. It would be nice to expect some minimal amount of translation, if they want it to be seen by English speakers. Just piping it through ...


7

Area 51 is where new Stack Exchange sites can be proposed. That is how this site began. There are currently two proposals for Mathematics-in-another-language sites, one in Korean and one in Spanish. You could add another proposal or support these ones. I don't know if it will ever happen, but it will might if the proposals get enough support on Area 51....


7

I'm French, and speak English fluently. I'd be glad to help you.


6

This is my solution. bfhaha.hostei.com/?p=5 Anyone can reply the question using Latex code. It use \( Latex Code \) instead of the dollar sign $. But it has no live preview (preview the equation) like Math Stack Exchange :( It is the most important part...


6

I've noticed that some users post their questions in both their native Chinese language as well as attempt an English translation. I think that is the best option here, since not only can English readers try to read the question, the Chinese readers here can easily edit to improve the translation. Similarly for answers in Chinese. In history, language ...


6

I oppose this idea. IMHO the last thing we need is to open the floodgates to questions posted by high school students world wide, and this suggestion might make that easier. (IMVHO it would be better to shut the door to all high school level material - possibly with the exception of contest math - as they usually don't inspire answers of permanent value ...


5

The comments to the original suggestion persuade me that this is a bad idea because it will produce an unbounded number of tedious and off-topic discussions like the one about "die/dice".


5

As Gerry Myerson links to, posting questions in another language is not against site rules here, and the majority opinion (at the time that thread was opened) was to allow such questions. This is yet another way in which math.SE differs from the majority of the other SE sites. However, such questions should have an English translation appended to them, and ...


5

There is a tag, translation-request, intended specifically for this purpose. To make such questions more acceptable (and avoid closure), I recommend that you post only one exercise per post, and (as mentioned in the comments above) you should provide some motivation for why you would like these exercises translated.


5

Vote here! [no downvotes please. Only upvotes count] $$\Huge{\mathrm{Yes.}}$$


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible