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9

This more-or-less summarizes some of the stuff which has already been said in the comments. If I understood correctly, the OP is asking about getting indices above/below the sign for integral or sum. I hope this answers the question at least partially. Probably the best thing to do is to show some examples: In the inline mode we can write $\sum_{n=0}^\...


7

The following: $$\left.\begin{array}{c} 5\\ 6 \end{array} \right] \quad 2\quad \left[\begin{array}{c} 1\\ 2 \end{array}\right.$$ is produced by $$\left.\begin{array}{c} 5\\ 6 \end{array} \right] \quad 2\quad \left[\begin{array}{c} 1\\ 2 \end{array}\right.$$ You can make the number smaller and/or add space by including blank lines, e.g. $$\left.\begin{...


5

You can define macros in MathJax. As far as I can tell, you cannot use numbers in macro names. For example, this defines a macro called \Rsq which then types $\newcommand{\Rsq}{\mathbb R^2}\Rsq$. $\newcommand{\Rsq}{\mathbb R^2}$ $\Rsq$ Macros can also use parameters. For example, the macro define below can be used as $\newcommand{\Map}[3]{{#1}\colon{#2}\to{...


5

It isn't pretty, but: $$ \left. \begin{matrix} 5\\[5ex] 6 \end{matrix} \right] \begin{matrix} \\ 2 \\ \\ \end{matrix} \left[ \begin{matrix} 1 \\[5ex] 2 \end{matrix} \right. $$ $$ \left. \begin{matrix} 5\\[5ex] 6 \end{matrix} \right] \begin{matrix} \\ 2 \\ \\ \end{matrix} \left[ \begin{matrix} 1 \\[5ex] 2 \end{matrix} \right. $$


4

In order to get the preferred notation in accordance with ISO 80000-2, use $$\sum\limits_{i = 1}^n {a_i}$$ $$\sum\limits_{i = 1}^n {a_i}$$ However, the following notations are also used $$\sum\nolimits_{i = 1}^n {a_i}$$ $$\sum\limits_i {a_i}$$ $$\sum\nolimits_i {a_i}$$ $$\sum {a_i}$$ $$\sum\nolimits_{i = 1}^n {a_i}$$ $$\sum\limits_i {a_i}$$ $$\sum\...


3

Yes. Do not type the \textsc part into your answer, and if you copy-paste, then remove it. If you want a less-manual hack, go to the start of your text: M-x replace-regexp <RET> \\textsc{\([^\}]*\)} <RET> \1 <RET> This should do the trick.


2

Testing: Does the phantom period appear if I simplify it to this? $\forall\,a,b\in\pi_1(S)\cup \pi_2(S)\colon aSb\Leftrightarrow f(a) S' f(b)$. Yes. In this screen grab, see the period after $aSb$, but the period after $f(a) S' f(b)$ is missing.


2

To make my comments into an answer: Firstly, you can define it manually, so \operatorname{sech}(x) renders as $\operatorname{sech}(x)$. A more fancy way is to put \DeclareMathOperator{\sech}{sech} somewhere in your post, and then \sech will work everywhere in the post. For example, I'll declare the operator (invisibly) here: $\DeclareMathOperator{\sech}{...


2

Use single dollars and \displaystyle and be sure to place spaces outside the dollars: Text before If I want to write $\displaystyle 2=1+1=2(0.5+0.5)=\sum_{n=1}^40.5=\sum_{n=1}^21$, this is happening but now it looks fine, at least to me, and the paragraph continues neatly. Text after


1

If you just want to make the fraction smaller, you can write: \tfrac M N $$ \tfrac M N \quad \text{versus} \quad \frac M N $$


1

Markov Chains This is a heuristic solution for coding Markov chains in Mathjax using a combination of commutative diagrams, the encircle tool and font sizes. There are a few minor issues with this method, for instance the arrows' ends should be attached closer to their targets. Also, it lacks double-headed diagonal arrows and it is difficult to attach ...


1

That's a feature. The two dollar-sign method is supposed to break the stuff between it onto its own line. Is this what you're trying to do? $$2=1+1=2(0.5+0.5)=\sum_{n=1}^40.5=\sum_{n=1}^21\text{this is happening}$$


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