24

Yes, this is the idea. As long as you have not reached 50 points, you can only do posts (questions and answers). An answer should be an actual answer to the questions; it can be a partial answer too, but it should be substantive. The reason why you cannot tell users what is wrong with their work is that, as unfriendly as this may sound, "we" first want ...


19

I think the existing answer probably makes more sense to someone who's already familiar with how the site works, so let me try to explain the policy from a more abstract perspective: This policy is meant to deter people who know absolutely nothing about math. If you belong here (which you obviously do), you'll accumulate the required reputation threshold ...


18

The answer is: don't. There's a reason that the software has a built-in check for minimum reputation before allowing one to post comments, and it is not nice to try to circumvent that. If you only have a tangential remark, ask yourself whether it really need to be posted. If you only have a partial answer, or an answer which you are not 100% certain is ...


18

First, as a moderator I would not be too happy about vetting such applications. Beyond just the added workload, there will be clearly good cases like yours, but then there will be other cases. Extrapolating from related experience, some will just not take "no" for an answer and this will be one more source of friction. Second, as a user I would point out ...


16

Click on the vote count of any post; you will see the breakdown. You can find more here.


16

The privileges are tied to reputation, so if you offer a bounty and your reputation drops below a privilege threshold as a consequence, you lose the respective privilege until your reputation again rises above the threshold. So if you offer a $50$-point bounty before you have at least $100$ reputation, you lose the "comment everywhere" privilege until your ...


15

I agree; there is much less need for new tags on an established math Q&A site than on a technology-oriented Q&A site. On a tech Q&A, users are likely to bring up questions about a new gadget or a new version of some software that was just released. Here we don't normally get questions about mathematical areas that were just recently ...


15

The site is community moderated and most tasks can be performed by users with enough points. One of these tasks is to (soft) delete posts, to review these deletions and to undo them if needed. To this end it is useful not to say necessary for those users to be able to see the deleted content, as explained in comments. It thus makes sense to give access ...


14

I imagine that it's actually a deliberate design decision to prevent people who won't use the Q&A function of the site from being able to use the stackexchange network as a chat server.


14

At 250 reputation, you earn the privilege to view and cast close/re-open votes on your own questions. The ability to vote to close/re-open others' questions is earned at 3000 reputation here.


14

Some questions, for reasons that are not always entirely clear, attract many "answers" that are not answers. Some of these could be additional questions. Some may be comments on existing answers. Some may simply say "Thanks!" Some may actually be spam (in the strict definition used by Stack Exchange). When this happens it is often worthwhile to protect the ...


13

There was a recent change to the system that prevents the protecting of questions by 15K users unless additional criteria are met. From bluefeet's answer on Meta Stack Exchange (emphasis added): 15k users will still be able to protect but in order to do so the question must have at least one answer by a new user aka a user with < 10 rep on the site (...


12

Yes.$\phantom{}$


12

This is not a bug. As soon as you'll reach 500 reputation points, you will be able to edit tags autonomously, that is: without approval from a user with higher reputation. Full editing privileges will be granted from 2000 reputation points on. In this specific instance, you suggested an edit to change the tag from real-analysis to probability which was then ...


12

Remember that you can give any user an explicit write access if you are the room admin. Simply click on “room▼” which is found under your room's name and click on “control access”. Now just add a user to your explicit write access. This works for any user even if they are low on reputation. And so start inviting 'em to chat! How'd you feel if you are ...


12

The commenting privilege was debated ad infinitum at meta.SO, and proposals to lower the threshold were declined, declined, and declined again. Keep in mind that math.SE is not an independent site and the system of privileges is network-wide. It seems pointless to rehash the arguments here. Concerning the scenario you describe: Anyone who later finds ...


12

Some SE sites (for example the trilogy sites Stack Overflow, Super User and Server Fault) have actual advertisements, and an actual reduce ads privilege which disables the full-width ads which appear on these sites. Here's an example recently seen on Stack Overflow: Mathematics Stack Exchange is not one of the SE sites which have these advertisements (...


11

After a quick check on this, we've increased the threshold to the suggested 1000 reputation. That seems a saner number than 1500 for here. Only a handful of tags are created in the 1000-1500 reputation range, many of which were things like conditional-probability and partial-derivative that are quite frequently used.


11

Bounties are meant to either draw attention to a question and reward a user that puts a lot of effort into answering the question, or to reward a great answer that was already posted. Like votes they should be focused on posts, not on users. Reputation and the privileges associated with it should be earned by participating on the site, not just gifted by ...


10

I don't know what you mean about commenting on others' comments. But any user can comment anywhere on their own question page: they can comment below their question or on any answer to their question. Further, they can use the @ functionality. Further, they can comment multiple times (as long as they don't try to comment multiple times in 15 seconds).


10

There was a bug where a disabled privilege could still show up when congratulating you for earning one. This has been fixed.


10

I know for a fact that you can cast delete votes (as you successfully helped to delete a question). I guess that what you see is actually a side effect of intentional restrictions. Namely, there are some restrictions on which posts you can vote to delete and the number of your delete votes is limited. In particular, you can only vote to deleted ...


9

I think the reputation limit on comments is principally to prevent an overwhelming number of comments of this type: great answer! btw have you seen this tip for quick weghtloss?? cheers mate Edits to questions and answers bump the post to the top of the "active" list; people will see them and flag them quickly. Comments don't do that, and so can escape ...


9

This already exists, somewhat, in the form of an association bonus. Essentially, if you earn 200 reputation on any Stack Exchange site, then each of your associated accounts on Stack Exchange sites will earn 100 reputation immediately. Even if you just create them! This is usually enough to get the basic privileges, such as set bounties (usually 75 ...


8

Those numbers aren't updated in real time; it may take up to an hour to reflect the change. I've force-updated your chat account, so have fun chatting now :)


8

https://math.stackexchange.com/privileges


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