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Recently I noticed a tag "gre-exam" in this question. A quick search ([*-exam]) showed existence of similar tags for GMAT as well.

In light of it, I wanted to ask the possibility of creating a tag csir-net-exam (or similar), as a lot of us aide to math.SE to prepare for it. I have already spotted >100 CSIR-NET questions (though not mentioned so in many of them) on math.SE, and I am sure to find much more!

I am unaware of norms for tag creation! What is the possibility of creating such a tag?

It will also help avoid a lot of duplicates (today I noticed nearly 3 duplicates of one question, all by people who have asked other CSIR-NET questions, and flagged ~5 pairs of duplicates just today).

The con I can think of is that it pertains to a specific country (India) and will all be objective type.

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    $\begingroup$ Earlier discussion of exam-based tags... I left a comment there defending the gre-exam tag, but an no longer sure I agree with it. One thing for sure, it's better if the exam name is the tag than the title of question (GRE Problem 4, GRE Problem 5, etc). $\endgroup$ – user147263 Oct 31 '15 at 18:39
  • $\begingroup$ I too believe that there should be a tag for CSIR-NET. $\endgroup$ – Croma14 Dec 15 '15 at 11:00
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Thanks for bringing this for meta discussion, instead of just creating a tag on an impulse (which sadly happens a lot).

I'll try to summarize pros and cones:

  • Pro: the tag helps in locating duplicates ("related questions" sidebar takes tags into account).
  • Pro: some students might figure out that by navigating to exam tag they can get a lot of typical questions (with solutions) for their practice, and hopefully ask fewer themselves.
  • Con: exam tags cannot stand on their own, since they are mostly meta-tags. Unfortunately, they do get used as the only tag. I spent a few minutes cleaning out GMAT, but GRE has more of this.
  • Pro: some exams have a peculiar format of questions, like GMAT questions about whether some combination of inequalities implies another or not. From this perspective, gmat-exam is not 100% meta-tag, since in combination with (inequalities) it locates a particular kind of problems with inequalities.
  • Side remark: I taught the Early Warning bot to advise against using exam tags as the only tag.
  • Side remark: tags ought not to be biased toward a country; it doesn't seem fair to say that U.S. exams get tags, but Indian do not.

Overall, I'm undecided. It would help to know whether these kinds of problems form a distinct category. Apparently, there is something special about their format, since you can tell that certain problems come from the NET exam.

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  • $\begingroup$ Though we can't pin point a field like that for GMAT, it can be mainly divided into four major tags: analysis, algebra, differential equations, and statistics. Its all MCQ (with 4 options). $\endgroup$ – Jesse P Francis Nov 1 '15 at 12:43
  • $\begingroup$ And I find it frustrating at times that even after thorough search, many questions are hard to find, and pop up in sidebar (only) after you have typed in the whole question as a new question. I am fairly good with google/math.SE search, and I still struggle, I can imagine the why many users tend to create duplicates! If I am not wrong >1/3rd of duplicates I reported are questions from NET exam! $\endgroup$ – Jesse P Francis Nov 1 '15 at 12:46
  • $\begingroup$ And as you mentioned, any provision to prompt user to add another tag apart from exam tag? $\endgroup$ – Jesse P Francis Nov 1 '15 at 12:48
  • $\begingroup$ so what do you suggest? Create tag? Or do you think I should give a try asking for mods' and other experienced members' opinion in their chat room? $\endgroup$ – Jesse P Francis Nov 2 '15 at 15:05
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    $\begingroup$ I suggest not to. All tags are misused, despite the creator's intention. More tags $\implies$ bigger mess. Just one example, meta.math.stackexchange.com/a/21103 $\endgroup$ – user147263 Nov 3 '15 at 4:04
  • $\begingroup$ Ok, I think I'll leave it then! Thank you for the directions! $\endgroup$ – Jesse P Francis Nov 3 '15 at 9:56

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