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36

To quote Asaf Karagila What a terrible terrible ... terrible terrible idea. (I might have opted for "awful" instead, to squeeze a couple more in there, but the sentiment is the same.) If you want to pay people to answer your questions, there are already sites which provide this service. So what benefits would it have here? None that I can see. In ...


29

Thank you. I am ambivalent on the badge idea. I am among those who already find sufficient motivation to offer bounties, and I don't know what positive or negative effects such a badge might have. Here is a related thread on meta.stackexchange.com: Badge for bounties offered?


27

If the answer is of very low quality, flag it as such. Other users will review this flag, and if necessary, the moderators will intervene. If you see a pattern of this behaviour in some users, or if you suspect foul play, please flag this as "in need of moderator attention" and explain the situation.


19

The second option. You should not change the question in a major way, especially when you have answers. This is true even for old questions, like this one. If you want to ask a new (related) question, then you should ask it in a new post and link back to the original.


19

The timeline of this post reveals that you started a bounty worth 100 points on that date. The bounties are deducted from the rep tally immediately.


19

It is fine to place a small bounty on someone else's question. The principal way* that doing so affects the author is that they might suddenly get a bunch of notifications about their question, which is typically welcome (although potentially surprising for old questions). If you're unsure of any particular case, you can use comments to ask the author about ...


18

The privileges are tied to reputation, so if you offer a bounty and your reputation drops below a privilege threshold as a consequence, you lose the respective privilege until your reputation again rises above the threshold. So if you offer a $50$-point bounty before you have at least $100$ reputation, you lose the "comment everywhere" privilege until your ...


18

I will just mention that on the very page you linked you can see that the reputation decrease was due to the bounty, together with name of (and link to) the relevant post.


17

Yes, there is an automatic process that will take care of the bounty if you do not award it yourself. From the help-center: If you do not award your bounty within 7 days (plus the grace period), the highest voted answer created after the bounty started with a minimum score of 2 will be awarded half the bounty amount (or the full amount, if the answer is ...


16

Unfortunately, there is very little that can be done about a bounty setter who has abandoned their bounty. Note that the bounty setter is notified via the site notification system, and email, if possible, that their bounty is about to expire. Beyond that there is a fail-safe, of sorts. First, the bounty period does not end at the end of the bounty period (...


15

One problem is that there are no reputation points on meta, thus it is not clear which points should be used "to pay" the bounty, and even more where the answerer should gain them. (For the first one might say, just use the points from main, but for the latter this is not really a good idea, to give points on main, for meta content.) Furthermore, the volume ...


13

I would not want such things to occur too much. If all posts had such a bounty, it would turn into chaos. But I don't think anything is wrong if you do this on occasion. I don't want to say that all must act grim and unhumorous to do math. Did this particular bounty bring about a solution with no flaws? Probably not. But did it hurt anything? Not in my ...


12

(This is an answer to my own question) I looked up some queries and found this. It gave all the relevant statistics about bounties. On average, a bounty will get 100 additional views and 3 additional up-votes. However, the average accept rate for a bounty is 31-48% while for a regular question the acceptance rate is 37-44%. Also, the average question gains ...


12

There can hardly be any good reason to change a question-post into something completely different, rather than to post a new question. If there is a bounty on the post it makes the situation even worse. In such a situation one can and should do at least one of the two: Flag for moderator attention (flag "other") and explain the situation. A moderator can ...


12

The bounty reasons are the same throughout the network. This bounty reason is easy to understand on sites like Stack Overflow: Releases of new versions of a software package can make answers referring to an earlier release outdated, that's not an uncommon occurrence. An analogous thing can happen in mathematics, a conjecture can be proven/disproven, ...


12

This is an unusual situation. The main problem is the repost of the question by the asker. This is not admissible. Somehow this went unnoticed. That they then got both bounties is an astonishing twist. Generally it is inappropriate to answer the exact same question twice rather than to mark it as a duplicate. That said, in this unusual case from the ...


12

In terms of reputation, one way to minimise the difference between the two answers is to upvote and accept the answer (by ticking it) you think is the most clear and of higher quality. This would gain them +25 rep. For the other answer, you can upvote too and provide the bounty of +50. This would gain them +60 rep; the difference is only 35 rep. As @Mars had ...


12

Welcome to the meta site! You are entirely within your rights to let the bounty expire. Personally, I think of bounties as a sort of 'custom order'. When you post a question on the site, you're de facto opening the door to any answers that appear, which you can accept or vote up/down as you please. When you post a bounty, however, because you're carving your ...


12

It is important to keep in mind that a question cannot be bountied immediately. It first needs to "survive" for some time on the site. I think there is some point to preventing closures of bountied questions. The points is they get more visibility by being bountied and thus also more exposure to potential votes to close. That said, if a question is ...


11

That can certainly be frustrating, and is a risk any time you offer a bounty. I don't know what your background is, but please note that MathOverflow is intended primarily for professional mathematicians and graduate students doing cutting-edge research. A sufficiently interesting question from outside that community will sometimes get a useful answer, but ...


11

No, you do not get the bounty back if no answer is given. In fact this is mentioned in the post you link to (my emphasis). What happens if there's no answer after the bounty period? If after the end of the bounty period a question has no answers, no bounty will be awarded and the question will no longer be featured. Bounties are best understood as ...


11

Sure, I do it all the time. Just make sure you leave a comment explaining what you want from the new answers.


11

As already mentioned in comments, SEDE can be used for such queries. I took the query showing the users with most bounties awarded and I have sorted it based pm percentage of the reputation given away in bounties: Highest percentage of reputation offered as bounties. One problem with the query is that all suspended users are in the database with reputation 1....


11

Keep in mind that Readers pay attention to your Questions on a voluntary basis, so there's no better mechanism beyond asking a good Question to promote attention. I'd expect the person who posted the Question to continue working on it until a solution that satisfies them is found. Posting problems that are difficult, without any idea of how to proceed, does ...


10

No and yes. Questions with open bounties cannot be closed for any reason, and this includes migration. In order for a question with a bounty to be migrated, the bounty would first have to be removed. Moderators can remove bounties (and refund the reputation in the process), but we only do this on a case-by-case basis. (See the MSO FAQ.)


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